Christopher Schwarz first impressed me with his boyish good looks and easy way with the ladies. Then I came to admire his as a scholar, craftsman and educator. Now I am in awe of his discipline and work ethic. This blog stuff is hard and he does it every day. Sometimes twice.

Topics aren’t hard. I have too many of them. Actually writing something coherent is non-trivial. First you have to get past the rather astounding notion that you can write something that another intelligent person would be willing to waste some of her/his dwindling life reading. A narcissistic act. Then there is spell check making you feel like the undereducated slob your teachers always knew you were (are). And the risk of disappointing a certain red-headed editor that I have come to accept as my spiritual mother in the task.

Eh, enough whining.

Back on topic, squares. Earlier this year I saw the Master was teaching a class on layout tools Highland Woodworking in Atlanta. My wife was in California at school for a few month so I had no reason to spend the weekend at home. Lots of things going on Atlanta. I know of a few quality hotels in the area for under $60 per night so I went.

During the class I made my third French layout square, the first being a factory second from Lost Art Press and the second being a genuine antique purchased at a MWTCA meet from Tony Murland.

Gen-u-ine antique French try square

Gen-u-ine antique French try square

A few weeks later I attended the same class sponsored by the Triangle Woodworkers in Raleigh, NC. Being an anarchist, Chris allowed me to use some his surplus parts to build a small Seaton square as described in this LAP blog:

This Try Square is a Little Bit of BS

When I got home that night, I looked at my copy of The Tool Chest of Benjamin Seaton, 2nd Edition and saw this was the small square at 15″ by 12″. The middle sized square is 25″ by 20″ and the large one is 32″ by 20″. So I found some cherry and built them.

From the left, try square from Atlanta, LAP factory second, small Seaton square, medium Seaton square and the large Seaton Square.

From the left, try square from Atlanta, LAP factory second, small Seaton square, medium Seaton square and the large Seaton Square.

That’s how I came to have three Seaton squares. Are the big squares useful? Everyone who kept borrowing mine at Chris’s boarded chest class at the Woodwright’s School thought so.