I’ve written before about knock down or flat pack furniture. IKEA didn’t invent the notion. Air is an expensive thing to ship and an armoire has a lot of air in it. It makes sense to ship the parts flat and assemble it on site. I’ve seen mostly armoires, pie safes and cupboards that came flat packed. I’ve heard from a reliable source that in olden times furniture makers in New York and Philadelphia would ship furniture parts to the hinterlands and depend on local furniture makers to assemble and deliver their furniture.

Another reason for breaking down furniture is to move it into and around the house. If you have ever toured an old house you know that many had very narrow and steep stairways. It is impossible to move any piece of assembled furniture up stairs or even down the hall.

But his armoire splits in half left to right.

One big happy armoire. It might have been given the shabby chic treatment or been off-white from the factory.

One big happy armoire. It might have been given the shabby chic treatment or been off-white from the factory.

Must be French. It has those fiche hinges.

Must be French. It has those fiche hinges.

Interior view of the fiche hinge,

Interior view of the fiche hinge,

I saw this armoire and opened the doors looking to see how it broke down. I didn’t see any reversible joints inside the armoire in the upper or lower corners. I looked down and saw this:

What an odd place for a wedged fastener. Center in the bottom.

What an odd place for a wedged fastener. Center in the bottom.

And then I looked up and saw this:

And a matching wedged fastener on the center top.

And a matching wedged fastener on the center top.

Back view showing the vertical seam.

Back view showing the vertical seam.

And then it occurred to me that this one splits into half vertically. How this makes ones life better, I’m not sure. It is easier to move if only a little.

This is a very odd piece. More pictures of this and others when I get the the rest of the set uploaded.