Can there be anything that goes against conventional tastes and standards that it can be considered wrong or are we tolerant of everything anyone does as long as it doesn’t cause us direct harm?

Twice a year there is a antiques festival in Cameron, NC. There are a large number of dealers in town and most of the open areas between buildings are filled with itinerant dealers. The churches in town make money by charging for parking. The unfortunate homeowners stuck in the midst of this bazaar get to sit on their front porch and look troubled while worrying about their lawn. Something for everyone.

In one of the permanent shops is this cabinet that has fascinated me for a few years now. Obviously not an antique. And obviously not to everyone’s taste. It has been there for a few years.

Really?!

Really?!

A closeup of pocket screw plugs as ornamentation. A daring aesthetic or just ugly?

A closeup of pocket screw plugs as ornamentation. A daring aesthetic or just ugly?

It is unusual to see pocket screw joinery (as popularized by Kreg Jigs) exposed. Pocket screws are conventionally used in the interior of cabinets and some mid-range custom furniture. I have a jig and use it for fixtures and a quickie table or two. Our mantle is built up with pocket screws. I am not endorsing pocket screw joinery. I know a few of you will be offended by me mentioning it without flat out condemnation. Pocket screws are useful in certain situations and in certain places.

Just not usually celebrated on the show side of furniture. But it takes all sorts.

Pocket screws are not a new invention. The technique has been around for years. I have seen many 18th and 19th century case pieces in which the top is attached using “pocket screws” through the back rail. Examples as I come across them.

Another darn dovetail picture.

But this one is different, really! This drawer side is having an internal dialog as to the proper dovetail angle. It is a hand cut dovetail from what I believe is a factory built piece of furniture. Which makes it more interesting to consider if this was the standard way they cut their drawers or an aberration.

Pick an angle, any angle. Why limit yourself to one?

Pick an angle, any angle. Why limit yourself to one?

And it came from this dresser.

More pictures when I post the Cameron set in a few days.

More pictures when I post the Cameron set in a few days.

And that’s all I have to say about that.