But first the back stories. My last auction and antiques blog is actually from February 20th of this year. It has been sitting out there on flickr until either I needed it or I came up with a narrative. I finally came up with a narrative and blogged it.

Story 2: On Monday I got a call from a friend asking I wanted to go about an hour north to visit some interesting furniture in a shop that is open by appointment only. It sounded to me like a plan. Well, he mumbles, I am part deaf and we were talking on cellphones. Hilarity ensued. I went up there. He wasn’t there. The shop wasn’t open. On my second call to him we connected. He was thinking Tuesday of next week. I went up a week early. Things happen.

Suddenly I had a few hours to kill before my scheduled quarterly haircut. I looked around and found a few small antiques shops. At the first shop I walked into, I saw something familiar. Remember this one from the last blog:

Look familiar?

Look familiar?

This is what I saw:

Old friend, new home. Click to see a novel back.

Old friend, new home. Click to see a novel back.

It’s just odd that a piece I had ignored for six months shows up again so quickly after I remembered it.

This dresser was there too:

Another migratory piece of furniture. Click for the dovetailed drawer.

Another migratory piece of furniture. Click for the dovetailed drawer.

Then there was a blog recently about a till in a chest, A Drawer Might Have Been Easier.

In the lower level of the same mall, I found a contemporary example of a “secret” compartment. I offer this as only an example.

A chest.

A chest.

A chest with a till on the left.

A chest with a till on the left.

A chest with till on the left opened.

A chest with till on the left opened.

A chest with till on the left opened with front removed revealing "secret" compartment.

A chest with till on the left opened with front removed revealing “secret” compartment.

Maybe concealed is a better word. The till front rides in the dadoes and just lifts out. One unique thing is that the till lid is inset (lies within the till) as opposed to the typical overlay door (sits atop the till). It does use the usual pintle hinge.

To round out this blog and make sure you get your money’s worth, I’m throwing in two more wall boxes. Both from the same local shop that had the last set. This one is billed as a candle box:

A candle box. Click to see the back and some very small snipe hinges.

A candle box. Click to see the back and some very small snipe hinges.


Then there is this one with a mirror:

Wall box with mirror.

Wall box with mirror.

And finally another poll. I found this in a drawer in another antiques shop:

A Bruce Willis 45 RPM single. How many lost cultural references are there in that phrase?

A Bruce Willis 45 RPM single. How many lost cultural references are there in that phrase?