The preview pictures of the auction did not look promising but I went anyway. It’s what I do. And I’m seeking treatment.

I looked around and saw that what seemed mundane at first was actually fairly interesting when you looked at the details. I’ve recently seen two benches with unique systems of folding. At least I hadn’t seen them before. Both are actually the same principle, legs that folds to the center locked in place by cross brace supports that also fold up. Only the details vary.

The first one has tubular cast legs:

Long view of the be bench.

Long view of the be bench.

The hook on the cross brace locks the legs in place.

Hook locks the legs.

Hook locks the legs.

To fold the bench, unhook the cross brace, fold the leg up under the cross brace and latch the hook onto the provided post. The cross brace holds the folded leg in place.

I couldn't actually fold the leg. Use your imagination. Click for an alternate view of the latched cross brace.

I couldn’t actually fold the leg. Use your imagination. Click for an alternate view of the latched cross brace.

The other bench uses similar mechanism but in wood.

Another folding wooden bench.

Another folding wooden bench.

Cross brace locks the leg down. To fold, lift the cross brace and the leg is able to fold toward the center.

Leg folds to the center. I'm not sure what locks the legs up. Click for an alternate view.

Leg folds to the center. I’m not sure what locks the legs up. Click for an alternate view.

I was intrigued by this antique exam table:

They don't make them like this anymore. Health codes.

They don’t make them like this anymore. Health codes.

especially when I saw the leg.

High style for an exam table. Look around on your next doctor visit.

High style for an exam table. Look around on your next doctor visit.

Then there is the matching waste receptacle:

A waste receptacle. Too nice to be a trash can.

A waste receptacle. Too nice to be a trash can.

This book shelf on secretary is not as old as some furniture:

Not the oldest piece in the auction.

Not the oldest piece in the auction.

but is has a rather interesting apparatus for supporting the slant front in the open position:

No lopers below. Just brass from above.

No lopers below. Just brass from above.

And this chest with a wooden pintle hinge:

IMG_6410

There is a pintle screwed to the back of the chest that passes through a hole in the end of the batten attached to the lid.

Side view

Side view

Top view.

Top view.

I wrote about this pintle hinge in the older blog: March, Orange County.

Click HERE to see the rest of the pictures from this auction.