Over the Labor Day weekend I got to spend a day in Adamstown, PA looking at more than just tools. They have furniture there, too. Lots of furniture. Primitives to pretty good. I haven’t found any five-figure antiques there. Some solid four figure antiques but I haven’t found the high-end stuff. Yet.

I have to settle for unique and interesting things. Both are subjective terms but it’s my blog and I get to choose. First piece is a bit of a puzzlement. A puzzle table of the jigsaw variety.

A bit of a puzzle.

A bit of a puzzle.

A puzzle top with hatch.

A puzzle top with hatch.

The hatch is opened by scratching it from the top with your fingernails trying to get purchase or pushing up from below. Right at the edge is a gap.

Hatch opens revealing storage.

Hatch opens revealing storage.

And it’s patented.

Patented 1871.

Patented 1871.

The top is fixed but the storage compartment is a carousel that rotates through eight storage compartments.

View of the storage carousel.

View of the storage carousel.

I did extensive research (a full three minutes on Google) and could only find one other example of this sewing/work table.

Another example.  Click to see the web site for this table.

Another example. Click to see the web site for this table.

Only missing the acorn drop finials. The web site claims the top rotates. In my example, the top is fixed and the storage carousel rotates. The puzzle is not veneer. The top is made from four identically cut pieces.

The last two pieces are variations of things I’ve written about before. Many months age, I showed an armoire that was divided in half, left to right. There are many armoires that break down and ship flat. This is only the second one I’ve seen that splits in half vertically.

Looks like a typical armoire.

Looks like a typical armoire.

Until you open the doors and look inside.

It is split from canopy to base.

It is split from canopy to base.

And finally, another “secret till”. Like the last two, this is another storage compartment below the till.

The chest. The mule chest has two drawers. I have been told this is a Pennsylvania form.  And I believe everything I am told.

The chest. The mule chest has two drawers. I have been told this is a Pennsylvania form. And I believe everything I am told.

The till. On the left. With more storage below.

The till. On the left. With more storage below.

The difference is that this till has a hinged door that opens to horizontal. It has a pintle hinge, round pieces that extend from the door into the chest carcass. The door extends beyond the hinge slightly. The back of this overhang is undercut slight to hold the door open horizontally.

Lower door opens to horizontal.

Lower door opens to horizontal.

I’ll bet there are more variations yet to find.