I could be that Adamstown was always loaded with tools, tool chests and workbenches and I didn’t notice. Now, with photographic evidence, I notice.

Lots of workbenches. Like this handsome devil:

What a nice bench.

What a nice bench.

There was text on the vise collars. I took a picture:

The

The mysterious text on the vise collar.

It says “C Christiansen, Chicago”. Turns out the Christiansen workbenches are fairly well known. While not common, not all that rare. A Google search shows many pages and references out there. Three of the more interesting ones are:

Ben Martin’s Christiansen Workbench Pictures

A Toolemera Blog: Another Christiansen Workbench

and from Sawmill Creek: My New (very old) Christiansen Co. Workbench

And then there is this poor, derelict, buried beast:

There's a bench there, really.

There’s a bench there, really.

that once had a sliding deadman:

There is a recess above for the deadman.

There is a recess above for the deadman.

And what seems to be a Nicholson style workbench:

Nicholson? Close enough.

Nicholson? Close enough.

Here is what seems to be a contemporary tool chest:

Doesn't look old.

Doesn’t look old.

with too many sliding tills.

Tills can't really slide unless you take out half of them.

Tills can’t really slide unless you take out half of them.

All this and more. Planes, saws, more beaches, more chests, a small lathe and more. To see this collection, click HERE.