Wrapping up my Adamstown travelogue, I offer a refresher course on painted chests. There are several styles of painted chests that can be divided into four major groups. First is painting for the sake of painting, much like you paint a house:

It's just paint.

It’s just paint.

Next there is the decoratively painted chests. Often religious, cultural or ethnic themes are portrayed. Some are celebratory, weddings, births. Some are just decorative:

IMG_6535

Could be cultural or ethnic.

Could be cultural or ethnic.

They ya got yer faux wood grained, often done to make the chest seem to be made from a better wood. Possibly to make it look veneered.

Kinda looks like wood. Better than I could do.

Kinda looks like wood. Better than I could do.

Then we move into the abstracts, starting with imaginative wood graining and quickly moving on to things I don’t understand and might never. Wood graining on mushrooms.

Close to natural wood.

Close to natural wood.

Swirling grain.

Swirling grain.

Wood grain from a tree we haven't met yet.

Wood grain from a tree we haven’t met yet.

And then there is this one I like but don’t get:

What is it, really?

What is it, really?

I had this earlier blog on painted furniture, “As Close to Easter Eggs as I’m Going to Get.”

And my legendary Flickr set of Chests.

If there are any discrepancies between this and previous blogs, rest assured that this blog is correct. It just goes to show how much I have learned and how much smarted I am now.

Or not.