that is the question I wish to cover here tonight.

It is a well guarded secret that I have a fascination with dovetails. Not enough to measure and analyze them but enough to take a picture of everyone I see. Part of the continuing fascination is the amount of “common knowledge” out there that is not borne out by the historical record. I am hear to say that there are other accepted methods of drawer construction. But you really can use dovetails if you want to.

I had an earlier blog about our friend, The Knapp Joint.

The Pin & Cove, Pin & Scallop, Half Moon, or Knapp Joint.

The Pin & Cove, Pin & Scallop, Half Moon, or Knapp Joint.

Let’s say that you have a drawer front that extends beyond the drawer box to hide some structural details.

(Note: Click on the below joints to see their parent pieces of furniture)

Looks like a rabbet into a dado.

Looks like a rabbet into a dado.

Actually, it is a sliding half dovetail. Other end of the drawer is conventionally dovetailed.

Conventional but not pretty.

Conventional but not pretty.

Or a drawer front with dimensional profile.

The extended drawer front also hides structural parts.

The extended drawer front also hides structural parts.

Again the sliding half dovetail. A rabbet would also work.

But some work hard and do the same. Like this drawer. Offset to allow for two improbable drawers.

Dovetails the hard way.

Dovetails the hard way.

In the above instance, the builder removed half the thickness of the drawer front and cut a half blind dovetail into the edge. Kindly ignore the nail.

Here’s another example of a reduction on a complex shape.

It's French. They do things differently.

It’s French. They do things differently.

This one is unremarkable but I like it.

A very nicely dovetailed drawer.

A very nicely dovetailed drawer.