When I was in Boston a few weeks back, I really didn’t have plans for Saturday. I did some research and came up with Manchester, NH. A few antiques shop, an Escher show and Frank Lloyd Wright’s designed Zimmerman House at the Currier Museum of Art. The kicker for me was the Millyard Museum at the old Amoskeag Manufacturing Company mill. I like museums. I love mills. A museum in a mill is a dream come true. As pilfered from the Wikipweida article: The Amoskeag Manufacturing Company was a textile manufacturer which founded Manchester, New Hampshire. From modest beginnings in near wilderness, it grew throughout the 19th century into the largest cotton textile plant in the world. At its peak, Amoskeag was unrivaled both for the quality and quantity of its products. But with great size came an inability to adapt. In the early 20th century, the business failed in changing economic and social conditions. It was/is a huge mill complex. This photo was from an earlier post billed as ironic for some:

Ironic for some, head scratcher for others.

Ironic for some, head scratcher for others.

What makes it ironic is the large AUTODESK sign. One of Autodesk’s main products is AutoCAD. High’ish tech in a historic mill. Anyway, inside the mill there isn’t much furniture. It was a mill after all, not a furniture factory. There is this one tall chest of drawers in the Queen Anne style. It was made by John Kimball for John and Molly Start in 1762.

A Queen Anne chest of drawers drawers as an example of regional furniture. Up here, not all furniture is dark brown.

A Queen Anne chest of drawers drawers as an example of regional furniture. Up here, not all furniture is dark brown. Or at least, not anymore.

We know it was made by John Kimball because unlike other furniture makers of his era, he signed his creations. Big. On the back. Like this:

A picture of a picture of the back. I assume the real thing looks very similar.

A picture of a picture of the back. I assume the real thing looks very similar.

There was a clock and these foundry patterns:

Foundry patterns. They made their own tools to make their tools.

Foundry patterns. They made their own tools to make their tools.

They were early adopters of integrated manufacturing. They wanted to make all the parts and the parts to make the parts and be dependent on no one. They were dominant manufactures of steam fire pumpers and early fire engines like these:

Like this one.

Like this one.

and this one.

and this one.

(They didn’t actually pump fire, the steam engines pumped water.) And they have looms:

Loom.

Loom.

And this loom.

same loom, different view.

And loom related stuff like this warp winding device:

A warp winder.

A warp winder.

To seem more pictures of the chest of drawers, pumpers and looms, click HERE to see the entire set.