The Swedes were inventing odd names for furniture before IKEA. What we have here is the Gungstol, a Swedish rocking chair:

Gungstol is Swedish for rocking chair.

Gungstol is Swedish for rocking chair.

Or it could be a reproduction. Might be real. It has the waterfall seat and high back. I can’t tell Swedish pine from American pine so I can’t say definitively where it’s from. Claims are these chairs were made from 1800-1900 although there was one picture of a rocker from 1740.

Seat is also wider than traditional rocking chairs.

Seat is also wider than traditional rocking chairs. Nice lines!

It does look like other examples of the Gungstol I have seen. Many of them were brightly decorated where this one is grey.

Almost looks normal from the back.

Almost looks normal from the back.

High-rise back. More comfortable?

High-rise back. More comfortable?

A few on-line articles that all sound too similar claim that the six legs were used to allow the use of longer rockers. This allows the rocker to rock back farther safely. I have a few issues with this explanation.

First, if you are rocking gently, there is a limit to how far back you can rock. Your legs are only so long. There is a limit to how far back you can push yourself. Do you need staff?

If you rock aggressively, for any number of Newtonian reasons, aren’t you going to rock as far forward? Rapidly? Do you need longer rockers in the front?

And how stable is the rocking chair at the end of its rearward travel? Why go back that far.

Waterfall seat and high back from the side.

Waterfall seat and high back from the side.

Good integration of the arm back.

Good integration of the arm back. Sweeping lines before Maloof.

We all need a bottom view.

We all need a bottom view.

I just don’t know why it is as it is. But it is. And it is similar to others out there. If any of you know more than I do, and I really hope you do, please fell free to share.