Back in December, I fled north to the Boston area to avoid a weekend beach rental with wife and friends. I don’t love the beach and this would have been the sixth trip to this Emerald Island rental house in the past seven years.

Boston sounded more interesting.

Saturday, I drove up to Manchester, NH to visit the Currier Museum of Art. I wrote about part of this visit in Come to New Hampshire for the Contemporary Furniture?

Aside from the M.C. Escher exhibit, the tasteful contemporary furniture and the Frank Lloyd Wright house, they had a nice collection of regional period furniture. One of the first pieces I noticed was this Federal dressing chest with mirror by Thomas Seymour from around 1807:

Not all old furniture is dark brown.

Not all old furniture is dark brown.

Thomas Seymour and his father, John, were important furniture makers in the early 19th century. (A brief article about them HERE.)

I was impressed by this chest on chest by Samuel Dunlap circa 1790-1795:

It's maple, another not-dark-brown wood.

It’s maple, another not-dark-brown wood.

An unusual top design.

An unusual top design.

Unusual molding around the lower chest.

Unusual molding around the lower chest.

And most unique feet.

And most unique feet.

This chest was described as “one of the most original and inventive pieces of American regional furniture from the late 1700s”. I can’t argue with that. I’ve not seen anything like it.

If you need to purge yourself of the horror of the odd table, you can check out the Currier’s collection HERE.