Back in Do As I Say, Not As I Do, I wrote about a “secret” compartment I had built for a Pennsylvania spice box. The spice box was from the class with Chuck Bender at 360 Woodworking. The secret compartment looked something like this:

It looks exactly like this.

It looks exactly like this.

Thursday I went to the preview for the quarterly catalog sale at the local high-end auction house.  An intriguing collection of furniture without a single dovetailed blanket chest. Amongst all the usual high-end auction stuff was this desk, billed as a Georgian Inlaid Slant Front Desk:

This is what a Georgian Inlaid Slant Front Desk looks like.

This is what a Georgian Inlaid Slant Front Desk looks like.

Open it up and it looks like this:

A banded and veneered gallery.

A banded and veneered gallery.

A unique prospect and document box configuration:

I like the drawer above the door.

I like the drawer above the door.

I looked over at the drawers on the right:

Notice the tongue and groove joint in the glued-up side panel.

Notice the tongue and groove joint in the glued-up side panel.

I pulled out the top drawers and they seemed too short compared to the rest of everything.

Top drawers in the back aren't as deep as other drawers.

Top drawers in the back aren’t as deep as other drawers.

I looked into the drawer pockets and saw there was something behind the drawers.

Left and right drawer stacks are identical.

Left and right drawer stacks are identical.

I reached in and pulled out this:

Look familiar?

Look familiar?

Another view.

Another view. Looks like the section of the divider was half-lapped

This picture gives you a view of how the drawers relate to each other.

IMG_2006

IMG_2007

Mr. Bender was right, these secret compartments exist. Who knew?

I also was drawn to the lower front of the desk:

Interesting treatment and inlay.

Interesting treatment with inlay.

Oh, that thing on top of the desk in the first picture is actually a WWII Vintage Norden Bombsight Sighthead.

Every techno-geek wants one. This one can be yours for an estimated $400 to $600.

Every techno-geek wants one. This one can be yours for an estimated $400 to $600.