Back in May of 2014, I wrote a blog about The Knapp Joint. It was one of the first successful machine-made joints used mainly 1890 to 1900 or so.

The Pin & Cove, Pin & Scallop, Half Moon, or Knapp Joint.

The Pin & Cove, Pin & Scallop, Half Moon, or Knapp Joint.

The main use for this joint was drawer construction replacing the hand-cut dovetail joint on better furniture.

I understand that hand-cut dovetails can be quite difficult to saw in that there are very precise standards that must be maintained if one is to have any chance of success. We all know there is only one right way to make a dovetail.

Before the Knapp joint, there was a simpler joint used, I call it, the half-Knapp:

Normal people call it a dowel joint.

Normal people call it a dowel joint.

I found it in this secretary:

Nice but not that old.

Nice but not that old.

with the obligatory gallery shot:

It's what I do.

It’s what I do.

And the expected gallery drawer.

Also a dowel joint.

Also a dowel joint.

Better than a rabbet joint alone and much faster (read cheaper) than a hand-cut dovetail. A precursor to the Knapp joint. I haven’t seen this all that often so I cannot say how much it was used. I have read about it but this is the first one I’ve seen. And you know I look.

I wonder if it was regional. Accepting all comments.

A few weeks back, I was catching up on some old podcasts from the boys at WoodTalk. Marc Spagnuolo was down with some child induced crud leaving only Matt Vanderlist and Shannon Rogers to carry on. And they do carry on. Toward the end of the show the discussion came around to whether or not they use dovetails for drawer construction. Neither used them routinely and Mr. Vanderlist made a comment about using more contemporary joints and using dowels on occasion. Dudes, it’s been done.

Ironically, the Knapp joint was replaced by the machine-cut dovetails, having a more natural, less industrial look.