They say The Truth is where you find it. I’m not sure they are but They sure do say lots of stuff without being held accountable. Has anyone ever fact-checked Them? Why do we trust Them?

I digress.

I found a truth over the weekend on a trip north into Virginia. The truth was always there, I had just never noticed it. Upon searching the archive, it’s been there the whole time. I just didn’t see it.

Sunday Morning we visited James Madison’s Montpelier near Orange, Virgina.

Educational Content: Montpelier is the home of James Madison, fourth president, scholar and one of the authors of The Federalist Papers. After his death, his wife, Dolley (correct spelling), was forced to sell the property. The house passed through several owners until finally being acquired by the du Pont family in 1901. They enlarged and remodeled the house to fit their needs and changing times. In 2003, a major undertaking was begun to restore the house to its 1820 appearance. Then the task of vetting furniture to be place in the restored mansion was begun. You can read more about the restoration HERE

We have toured Montpelier several times since before the restoration was finished. We are impressed by the work done and are fascinated watching it being slowly refurnished. We took a tour Sunday morning I spent a great deal of the tour looking at the furniture. Photography is not permitted so I had to actually look at the furniture.

I noticed something that was common to all the case pieces that I had never noticed outside the mansion. It wasn’t just some of the case pieces, it was all the case pieces I saw. I really wanted to take pictures but I didn’t want to embarrass my wife.

On our way home, we stopped and toured another mansion, this time in Lynchburg, VA. Point of Honor is a mansion built by Dr. George Caleb from 1806 to 1815. It has been restored and partially repopulated with furniture. Photography is permitted. And so I did.

What I saw at Montpelier I also saw at Point of Honor. It might not seem like a big deal but I had never noticed it before. What I saw was all the case pieces, cupboards, secretaries, had overlay doors hinged directly to the carcass with no face frame.

Like this.

Like this.

No face frame.

No face frame.

And another example:

Frame free.

Frame free.

A more conventional arrangement is an inset door within a face frame like in pie safes:

Conventional yet not common.

Conventional yet not common.

Another arrangement is the overlay door with a face frame:

fff

It’s French but it is a good example of an overlay door with face frame.

And here is an inset door with no face frame:

My spice box not finished yet.

My spice box is not finished yet. Soon…

Looking through my archives, I realize that this frameless overlay door exist in greater numbers than expected. I don’t know why I hadn’t noticed it before, but I didn’t. Good thing I have an extensive library.

I must do better…

Here are some more examples.

Tall and plain.

Tall and plain.

Frameless secretary.

Frameless secretary.

Very clean and light lines.

Very clean and light lines.

A bit fancier.

A bit fancier.

And the details.

And the details.

And something embarrassingly recent.

Nice but not that old.

Nice but not that old.

A furniture set coming soon.