This is Part 2 of the pictures from a weekend in the Charlottesville, VA area. Looking over the set, I realized that there was a confirmation of something I had been told but never seen.

A while back, I took Chris Schwarz’s boarded chest class. On the last day of the class, he talked about patterns scratched on the front of most boarded chests he’s seen with auction pictures to back up his claim. I, on the other hand, have over a hundred pictures of chests with no patterns scratched on them. Until now.

I found this chest:

IMG_4487

With a pattern scratched into the front. Two patterns, actually.

It's faint but there.

It’s faint but there.

Was Chris right? It’s possible…

I still need more evidence.

Next, the contradictions. While discussing chest with Chuck Bender, I mentioned that tills tend to be on the left. Mr. Bender stated that tills are always on the left. One thing I try to avoid is making any definitive statements about furniture. Not everyone has read the same book. They don’t know they’re wrong.

Here are two chest with tills on the right. The first one not only has a till on the right but it has a secret compartment.

Ordinary enough.

Ordinary enough.

Till is on the right.

But it looks too deep.

But it looks too deep.

The till front lifts off:

Revealing what I believe is a drawer. The drawer was stuck and I didn't want to risk $1,400 to verify.

Revealing what I believe is a drawer. The drawer was stuck and I didn’t want to risk $1,400 to verify.

The other chest is this painted number:

Again, I liked it, but I didn't buy it.

Again, I liked it, but I didn’t buy it.

It too, has the till on the right.

An ordinary, lidless till.

An ordinary, lidless till.

The chest gets extra credit for having snipe hinges:

Look it up if you are unfamiliar with the term.

Look it up if you are unfamiliar with the term.

The conundrums come from a few pieces that defy convention. Like this unconventional bombe chest:

This is wrong. Bombé is flared bottomed, thinning toward the top

This is wrong. Bombé is flared bottomed, thinning toward the top.

They didn’t read the book either.

Here we see one of two pieces with a veneer other than crotch/flame mahogany.

Maple veneer on a Southern piece?

Maple veneer on a Southern piece? It’s been known to happen.

This is a very late 19th century/very early 20th century server assembled with pocket screws.

Pocket screws before Kreg.

Pocket screws before Kreg.

Lastly this interesting chair. Not all that special, just interesting:

I just like interesting thing.

I just like interesting things.

To see the balance of the pictures, click THIS.