I am running the risk of becoming like one of those internet teens that goes to the mall a few times a week then posts a video of what they bought and why it is the best stuff ever. This isn’t the best stuff, just fairly interesting stuff. Or so I think. Your opinion may vary.

I found a huge place in Springfield, MO that I will need another day or two to process. There was a ton of stuff at one mall. Before leaving, I found a smaller shop filled with all things English. A few things I really liked, prices were reasonable but my budget has been strained by my recent good fortune. Walking out of the shop I spotted something in the window I could afford.

A nice compass.

A nice compass.

with interchangeable part.

with interchangeable parts.

Triangular mortises.

Triangular tenons.

Matching mortises.

Matching mortises.

Who is W. Hazzledine? I assume the maker but I can find no maker by that name.

Who is W. Hazzledine? I assume the maker but I can find no maker by that name. English or at least bought in England.

Monday I spent a night in Nashville. Having some time the next morning, I decided to see if there were any interesting antiques shops in town. I’m not sure there are. Most of the shops I visited didn’t really have much of interest to me. There was a high-end shop that was annoyingly French in content. The real over the top fancy/expensive stuff. A little goes a long way. There is the basic cable celebrity shop in town that has more branded merchandise for sale than antiques. The interesting stuff is all NFS (not for sale).

If there are good ones that I missed, let me know. There was one large eclectic shop at which I purchased this 7.5″ amber, hand blown flip:

Clevenger Brothers Glass Works, Clayton, NJ. 1940-1950.

Clevenger Brothers Glass Works, Clayton, NJ. 1940-1950. $6 US.

Moving on. I drove a few hours and needed to take a break. There were a few antiques shops listed on the highway attraction signs for Cookeville, TN. I stopped. First shop had little of interest. The next shop was larger with more stuff but nothing really out of the ordinary until I found this box within another box:

A nice oak box.

A nice oak box.

Seems to be in parts.

Seems to be in parts.

Patented February 19, 1889.

Patented February 19, 1889.

It actually unrolls. A few pieces missing.

It actually unrolls. A few pieces missing.

With places for other parts.

With places for other parts.

Who can tell me about this hinge?

Who can tell me about this hinge?

Another view of the hinge.

Another view of the hinge.

This is a Singer “Puzzle Box” sewing machine folding parts and accessory box. More of them out there.

As I left the shop, I asked the counter person if there were any other shops of note in town. After determining my interests, she recommended two other shop in the downtown area. She was right.

This shop was full of interesting and pricey furniture. There was one box that I both liked and could afford. Yet another sewing related box. Actually, a sewing box:

Inlaid sewing box.

Inlaid sewing box.

Fancy lid,

Fancy lid.

Fancy front.

Fancy front.

Fancy back, too. Note the stop hinges.

Fancy back, too. Note the stop hinges.

The interior has a mirror and tray. Fairly fancy.

The interior has a mirror and tray. Fairly fancy.

Here is the tray.

Here is the lift-out tray.

Flip up pin cushion.

Flip up pin cushion.

False bottom is decorated.

False bottom is decorated.

Bottom is hinged and flips up to reveal and even fancier panel.

Bottom is hinged and flips up to reveal and even fancier panel.

Bottom is screwed but not clocked.

Bottom is screwed but not clocked.

My fear is that one of you will tell me that this box was made in Indonesia for the Bombay Company before they went away. Or this is a freshman project at Cedar Ridge High School. Hinges look too expensive to a Bombay Company piece.

Finally, the last shop was interesting but not useful. Some antiques, some vintage, some steam punk. Then I saw this cooper’s plane:

A cooper's plane (?) with curved blade,

A cooper’s plane (?) with curved blade.

I can't read the maker's name but I bet one of you know what is says.

I can’t read the maker’s name but I bet one of you know what is says.

Looks like the blade is bedded at 45°.

Looks like the blade is bedded at 45°.

Bottom view is unhappy child with pigtails.

Bottom view is unhappy child with pigtails.

Screws need to be dressed before its next use.

Screws need to be dressed before its next use. And clocked.

And only three parts. Take that Stanley.

And only three parts. Take that Stanley.

I finally made at home and decided I need to give the whole buying thing a rest. Unless it can’t be avoided.