One floor of the Swiss National Museum is dedicated to furnishings including furniture, entire rooms and the contents there of. The is one exhibit that displays decorative woodworking techniques including marquetry and intarsia.

One of the exhibits.

One of the exhibits. My feet at the bottom. Wearing white after Labor Day.

The illustration looked familiar and it turns out I knew it.

An old friend.

An old friend.

Explained.

Explained.

It is a plate from André Jacob Roubo’s L’Art du Menuisier (The Art of the Joiner). Those of us who are even vaguely aware of Chris Schwarz and Lost Art Press know that Roubo was an 18th century carpenter and cabinet maker. His book, L’Art du Menuisier (The Art of the Joiner), is an object of veneration to many woodworkers and scholars. LAP has issued a translation of the section on marquetry, veneer work, wood selection, finishing and some casework, To Make as Perfectly as Possible. They have also issued The Book of Plates containing every single illustration from all of the volumes.

(End of plug)

At the other end of the case there’s more:

Intarsia.

Intarsia supplies.

And a plate.

And a plate.

Again, an explanation.

Again, an explanation.

To be fair, they also included a non-Roubo plate:

Skilled but no Roubo.

Skilled but no Roubo.

More explanations.

More explanations.

While we are on things close to Herr Schwarz’s heart, I offer these images with no explanation. Also in the museum.

IMG_9224

IMG_9226

IMG_9227

IMG_9228

OK, a little explanation:

The xxx chair.

Known to us as the Roorkhee chair or facsimile.