After spending a few days in Cape Town, we headed up to the Winelands of South Africa. I’m not going to say whose idea it was but I don’t drink. Permanent Designated Driver. It’s good to know ones place in the world.

In the town of Stellenbosch we found the appropriately named Stellenbosch Village Museum. The Museum currently consists of four restored and furnished houses covering the periods from 1709 to 1850. This blog will cover the 1709 Schreuderhuis and the 1789 Blettermanhuis.

From their website: Schreuderhuis is the oldest restored and documented town house in the whole of South Africa. The interior furnishing and the garden are typical of a Stellenbosch home from the period of 1680 – 1720, in true pioneer spirit much of the furniture was made from locally available materials.

A quick tour of the furniture collection starts with this workbench (of course):

An early 18th century workbench.

Even in the 18th century any horizontal surface becomes storage.

With all the recent interest in staked furniture I needed to include one of several three-legged stools in the house:

Three legs are good enough. Who needs four?

Three legs are good enough. Who needs four?

A books on Cape furniture styles insists that corner chairs are more common here than in Europe.

A style of corner chairs I've not seen before.

A style of corner chairs I’ve not seen before.

Just to prove using natural forms is not a new concept:

A different three legged stool.

A different three-legged stool.

Click HERE to see the furnishings from the 1709 Schreuderhuis.

Again, copying and pasting from the Museum’s own website:

The second home in the museum complex is Blettermanhuis. This house has been restored and furnished to illustrate a wealthy Stellenbosch home from around the period of 1750 – 1790. Blettermanhuis was built in 1789 by Hendrik Lodewyk Bletterman, who was the last landdrost (magistrate) of Stellenbosch to be appointed by the Dutch East India Company.

Furniture here is much more stylish and reflects the tastes of a wealthy family of the era compared to the earlier utilitarian furnishings. First there is this corner cabinet:

Fancy with its half columns and carved feet.

Fancy with its half columns and carved feet.

If we can believe the exhibits, gate leg tables are all the rage:

There were a lot of this style table all over.

There were a lot of this style table all over.

One thing that makes these tables unique is use of the half legs:

These were also quite common in the area.

These were also quite common in the area. Latch is interesting as well.

This is part of the collection of foot warmers:

Embers were placed in these metal lined boxes. Not sure they are safe. No UL bug. (Underwriters Laboratory.)

Embers were placed in these metal lined boxes. Not sure they are safe. No UL bug. (Underwriters Laboratory symbol.)

Last of the free preview is this colorful armoire(?):

Not sure of its proper name but it is attractive.

Not sure of its proper name but it is attractive.

To see the furniture from the 1789 Blettermanhuis, click HERE.

Lots more furniture coming up before we start on the animals:

Many animal pictures to come.

Many animal pictures to come.