Two down and two to go.

Last blog covered the 1709 and 1789 houses at the Stellenbosch Village Museum. Tonight, we move forward in time and cover the 1803 and 1850 houses. I have cut and pasted the descriptions of the houses being lazy enough not to want to rewrite their more than adequate descriptions and honest enough to admit it. Not not all are.

First the Grosvenor House (1803)

Originally built by Christian Ludolph Neethling in 1782, Grosvenor House was added to by successive owners until it reached its present appearance in 1803. Grosvenor House, along with Koopmans de Wet House and the Martin Melck House in Cape Town, is one of the most outstanding examples of a two-storeyed, flat-roofed patrician town house, of which there was a considerable amount in Stellenbosch as well as in Cape Town.

A large garden and early 19th century appointments characterise this home, which represents the period from 1800 – 1830.

The furniture is also moving forward in time. This square piano looks to me to be more from the 1840’s but what do I know?

!830's? 1840's. Who knows?

1830’s? 1840’s. Who knows? Only one pedal though. The other two come later.

While talking about pianos, this is a rare cabinet piano:

Claimed to be one of six in museum collections. I've seen similar ones at Winterthur and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Claimed to be one of six in museum collections. I’ve seen similar ones at Winterthur and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The strings and soundboard are rotated to the vertical. This leads to a few interesting modifications to the action.

One fairly common motif is contrasting colors:

Light furniture with contrasting accents.

Light furniture with contrasting accents.

Here is an armoire  that follows suit:

A dark carcass with light panels.

A dark carcass with light panels.

More of the gate leg table:

with more half legs.

with more half legs.

There is visible storage on the second floor:

You can see but you can't touch.

You can see but you can’t touch. More chairs than you can sit in.

To see all the interesting furniture in the Grovenor House (1803), click HERE.

And finally,

OM BERGHHUIS (1850)

The fourth house, which was the home of O.M. Bergh, originally had a thatched roof and gables similar to those of Blettermanhuis. During the 19th century it was altered to look as it does to this day. The home of O.M. Bergh is a typical mid-nineteenth century home with wall-paper, furniture and accessories from the period of 1850 – 1870. O.M. Bergh and his family lived in this house from 1836 up to 1877.

It starts with this bookcase on secretary:

A nice piece.

A nice piece.

A little something for the kitchen:

I've seen similar pieces at unfinished furniture shops.

I’ve seen similar pieces at unfinished furniture shops. Not really.

A handsome press:

I don't believe there is a flatscreen in the upper section.

I do not believe there is a flat screen in the upper section.

Another unique piece:

Claimed to be the first free-standing shower in Southern Africa.

Claimed to be the first free-standing shower in Southern Africa.

A room full of Thonet bentwood furniture:

We are moving to modern times. Much of this furniture is still made.

We are moving to modern times. Much of this furniture is still made.

This piece looks familiar:

Similar to one I bought.

Similar to one I bought.

I covered its cousin in Writing Ain’t Cheap.

To see the O.M. Berghhuis, click HERE.