If you have been reading this blog for a while you might have noticed that I have a fondness for Winterthur. Formally known as Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library, it houses the approximately 85,00 pieces of Henry Francis du Pont’s collection of American decorative arts. The collection covers roughly 1640 to 1860. (It is also known as the Bayou Bend of the North but only by me.)

My wife and I made our annual pilgrimage north for the Yuletide Tour for what must be the 20th time in the past 25 years. We usually go over the Thanksgiving weekend.  A visit to our adopted/chosen family, other friends and Longwood Gardens for their Christmas display completes the weekend. Keeps us out of the malls.

We arrived at Winterthur and found that the exhibition in one of their galleries was Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light running through January 3rd, 2016. Their site phrases if so eloquently when they state:

Organized by The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass in New York City, Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light is comprised of five windows, twenty lamps, and seventy-five pieces of opalescent flat glass, in addition to educational models illustrating how leaded-glass shades are selected and fabricated, along with three examples of Tiffany lamp forgeries to explore issues of authenticity and connoisseurship.

Lot of pretty stuff like this one:

Looks like Christmas to me.

Looks like Christmas to me.

Floor lamps:

They really are not a good source of illumination.

They really are not a good source of illumination. Stunning but they project gray.

And pendant/hanging lights:

More of the Christmas colors.

More of the Christmas colors.

And windows:

Based on La Liseuse, a painting by Jules-Joseph Lefebvre (French, 1836–1911)

Based on La Liseuse, a painting by Jules-Joseph Lefebvre (French, 1836–1911)

I love this window. This is where blogging can get to be a pain and a time sink. When I read this window was based on a painting, I thought it appropriate to show the painting that inspired it. A Google search quickly found me this:

La Liseuse,  Jules-Joseph Lefebvre. It is either in black and white or somebody turned the saturation way down

La Liseuse by Jules-Joseph Lefebvre. It is either in black and white or somebody turned the saturation way down

It was odd that such a beautifully colored window came from a monochrome painting. It does give the glass artist a great deal of latitude in color selection with nothing to compare it to. It could be quite liberating yet I couldn’t accept it, yet. I don’t know much about late 19th century French (or any other) oil painting.

I kept looking but found no color. Or commentary. Not much written about this painting that I could find. It must not be one of Jules-Joseph Lefebvre’s more important paintings.

It is very likely that one of you know more than I do about this topic. If so, please share. I would like to know more.

Another shortcoming of mine is not taking copious notes. Three of the lamps on display were fake, false, faux, mock, forgeries. Not the real things. Close but no solid silver cigar lighter. I believe it saw the first three which are now the last three in my album on Flickr. If you know better, again, please feel free to share.

Might not be real.

Might not be real. Well, obviously it’s really. Just maybe not Tiffany.

Click HERE to see the rest of the set. Remember, the last three might be or may not be the real thing. But, they are well executed.

If you are in the Philly/Wilmington area, you should stop in.