In a comment on yesterday’s post, Roger Davis wrote:

Both pieces are crozes, a cooper’s tool for cutting the groove where the head of the bucket or cask seats. Being a sawtooth croze, it was pretty certainly built for white cooperage, the making of pails, buckets, tubs, churns, etc. (stuff with straight staves). The tools should be assembled with the teeth toward the curved side of the body/fence. The fence rides on the end of the bucket, etc. and guides the cutter like that of a marking gauge. The surface of the post provides a depth stop for the cut, and the projections on the flat side of the fence are handles for turning the croze inside the bucket. The resulting groove for the head is also called a croze.

I have no problem with people knowing more than I do. It would really bother me to be the smartest person in the room. I recognize my limitations. Some days I seem to celebrate them.

I have no reason to doubt him but wanted to do a bit of research before accepting it. I did a quick Google search on croze and found lots of pictures of Marie-Josée Croze, a Franco-Canadian actress. She won the award for Best Actress at the 2003 Cannes Film Festival for her performance in The Barbarian Invasions. An attractive enough woman but not really relevant to this post.

A search for croze tool proved to be more useful. Seems Mr. Davis was right. I offer the following pictures from Hank Williams at woodbucket.com:

Hank, I assume, using a croze to make a croze.

Hank, I assume, using a croze to make a croze.

and Rob Gorrell at http://robgorrell.com/:

A croze sitting atop a bucket.

A croze sitting atop a bucket but you get the idea.

Here is a picture of another croze at the same shop in South Africa. It cost more and had less “character”.

Still in Stellenbosch if you're interested.

Still in Stellenbosch if you’re interested.

The blade is aligned as described in the comment. I set up my croze similarly and it didn’t look right:

Something is not quite right with this picture.

Something is not quite right with this picture.

I don’t have a picture but the beam is about 10° off true when oriented with the blade up. Blade up, the wear from the wedge is on the wrong side, no marks from being driven home:

This side of the beam shows little wear.

This side of the beam shows little wear. Note the layout lines and notch for the blade.

This side looks like it has been hammered -and wedged. I believe the screw is a repair.

This side looks like it has been hammered and wedged. I believe the screw is a repair.

If the beam and blade are installed with the teeth toward the straight edge, all things align. The beam is true to the face, the wedge and hammer marks are where they should be and the wear on the face works with the edge of the vessel being crozed.

This is as it was in the shop, blade down.

This is as it was in the shop, blade down. Notice the circular wear on the lower section.

The area I thought had been thinned in yesterday’s post is actually honest wear. I believe somewhere along the way this tool has been reacquainted with wax that covers some of the obvious wear.

It might not have been used as designed but it has been used hard.

The croze from Delaware in yesterdays post had a slicing blade not a toothed blade. I don’t know what that means.

 

The toothless croze.

The toothless croze.

Tomorrow, back to furniture.