We are all getting ready to move on from Winterthur but there are still a few more things to share. Like most museums, Winterthur’s collection is considerably larger than the public display space. One of the galleries on the lower level is used to display parts os the permanent collection with a shared theme such as Southern furniture or Philadelphia furniture. Another gallery displays furniture from different eras.

This set of pictures is of items I found interesting that may not fall into any particular larger theme, just interesting in their own right. First up is this kas (armoire) built by Dutch settlers on Long Island between 1650 and 1700:

No Long Island Dutch-American home complete without a kas.

No Long Island Dutch-American home complete without a kas.

As part of the display, they have reproduced the inlay on the frame:

Looks like a nice project for a cold winter afternoon.

Looks like a nice project for a cold winter’s afternoon. If you can find all the different woods.

Here is another armoire just like Grandma used to have:

Assuming your Grandmother was named du Pint.

Assuming your Grandmother was named du Pont.

And the last picture I offer to pique your curiosity:

A jointed chest dated 1676 found in Ipswich, RI>

A jointed chest dated 1676 found in Ipswich, RI.

I would show you more picture but then you would have no reason to visit the set on Flickr. You can see that set by clicking HERE.