I’m not a tool collector. I know I’ve said it before, but I’m not. I believe it goes to intent. I do not go out with the intent of acquiring tools. It’s an organic process. It just happens. I see something that might be considered a tool, it speaks to me and then follows me home.

Such is the case with my latest purchase. I was recently sentenced to Las Vegas for a week. It was for business or more importantly for the check. And the per diem. I had some free time and did a tour of the usual antiques shop. Nothing great but it is more interesting than sitting around the hotel. I saw a saw that looked interesting, took a few pictures, put it back and walked away. I couldn’t quite make out the logo or manufacturer’s name on the blade.

I went back to the hotel and did some research. Within a few minutes I discovered the saw maker and the pedigree of the saw. I was hooked. When I knew nothing about the saw, it didn’t matter. Once I knew its history, I was sunk. It was over. I was out $41.00 less 15% (sale) plus 8.1% state sales tax. $37.67 or so.

Here is the saw:

Interesting saw, no?

Interesting saw, no?

The blade moves:

It moves up.

It goes up and down.

And you can take the blade out:

A back saw without the saw part.

A back saw without the saw part.

The blade has teeth on three edges. 12 ppi on one long edge, 8 ppi on the other.

The teeth on the end of the blade engages in the frame to lock it into place. Not for cutting.

The teeth on the end of the blade engage the frame to lock it into place. Not for cutting.

The handle has a lever to set tension on the blade and lock it in:

it locks the blade at the selected depth with the preferred teeth.

it locks the blade at the selected depth with the preferred teeth.

Bottom view.

Bottom view.

When I got the saw back to my room I did more research and confirmed what I though.

The saw is by Shapleigh Hardware of St. Lois, MO.

The saw is by Shapleigh Hardware of St. Lois, MO. as stated on the blade with their Diamond Edge slogan below.

This saw’s intent was to be two saws in one. For instance, a rip and a crosscut. Just flip the blade over, what could be easier? One could also set depth of cut by moving the blade up and down. Having played with the saw a bit, I think two saws would have been a better use of their money.

Lee Valley/Veritas has an article about the Bishop’s Patent Saw in their newsletter. Only four short pages, a quick read.

As long as we are speaking tool, I want to rant about this picture I saw in a magazine recently:

This bothers me, inappropriate foot ware.

This bothers me, inappropriate footwear.

This picture must have been in either Garden and Gun or Field and Stream magazine. No legal team at any respectable woodworking magazine would allow flip-flops to be worn by somebody using power tools any more than they would allow pictures of a table saw being used without a blade guard and riving knife. Technically, he/she is not in the shop, but still…

It looks like the kind of thing you would see in Arkansas but for the fact they look more like mall flip-flops and not the ones you would get at your local dollar store.

The other major safety issue with this picture is missing accessories. There is the following label on every DeWalt DW735 planer:

Read and understand all safety information before using power tools. Hand tools, too.

Read and understand all safety information before using power tools. Hand tools, too.

I don’t see either a dust collector or a dust chute.

Dust chute, DeWalt 5140011-49

Dust chute, DeWalt 5140011-49, available from your local DeWalt dealer or online.

Can you image the lawsuit if the improperly protected feet came in contact with the exposed fan?

Not pretty.