It has been brought to my attention that I might have offended some fans of Arkansas with my blog yesterday. No offense was intended. To the best of my knowledge I have only been to Arkansas twice and both of those visits ended well.

The first time was in April of 1984. We were working in Memphis, TN and decided we needed to get some more floppy disks. We weren’t desperate; we just thought it would be a good idea to have spares. We called around and found a box of 8″ hard sectored, double-sided, double-density floppies at the Radio Shack® at the mall in West Memphis, Arkansas. We drove over there and bought them. It was pleasantly uneventful. A good time was had by all.

An interesting (to me) bit of trivia about our computer. We were using an LSI-11, a DEC PDP-11 only smaller. We were big time in that we had two 8″ floppy drives. If we traveled out of the US to a country with 50Hz power, we had to change the drive belt and pulleys on the drives. Things have changed.

The other time I recall being in Arkansas was April 2nd, 2013. We were driving back from California and stopped at the McDonald’s in Forrest City, Arkansas to do what one does when one stops at a McDonald’s in Forrest City. One NPR commentator described vacations moving gallons of Diet Coke from one McDonald’s to the next.

This McDonald’s impressed me because the seating was all genuine Emeco Navy chairs.

All genuine Emeco Navy chairs and variants.

All genuine Emeco Navy chairs and variants.

For those not in the know, the Navy chair is an iconic piece of Americana. From the Emeco web site:

First built for use on submarines in 1944, the Navy Chair has been in continuous production ever since. With the famous 77 step Process, our craftsmen take soft, recycled aluminum, hand form and weld it – then temper it for strength. Finally, the chair is anodized for a durable finish. We guarantee the Navy Chairs for life.

I have my own Navy chair:

Everyone should have one as a part of their basic Americana collection.

Everyone should have one as a part of their basic Americana collection.

So, you see, I have nothing but good things to say about Arkansas. My blog yesterday was just referring to the Norman Rockwell-like childhood of a well-known flip-flop wearing tool expert. The kind of simple, off-the-grid, bucolic existence we all wish we could read about somebody else living.