I think I might have mentioned that I recently picked up my fourth Thomas Day game table. Or, at least, what I believe is a Thomas Day game table. Lacking manufacturer’s markings or any direct link back to the original owner, it can only be said it is consistent with his designs, techniques, materials and geography.

To recap, his is the first one I came across a little over a year ago:

You always remember your first.

You always remember your first.

Then, two and three:

Or is it three and two.

Or is it three and two?

Here is number four found at a local antiques mall for which I either paid too little or too much:

Ta-da!

Ta-da!

The now familiar foot:

Dainty yet sturdy.

Dainty yet sturdy.

Same transitional molding:

Graceful.

Graceful.

Unique stanchions…

with a heart.

with a heart.

Nice veneer on the top:

I would like to be able to do this.

I would like to be able to do this.

Less interesting on the inside:

Interesting veneer costs more:

Interesting veneer costs more. Still nice but less so.

Top view of the structure.

Top view of the structure.

Cross member is dovetailed to the frame.

Cross member is dovetailed to the frame.

Back of the frame is dovetailed.

Back of the frame is dovetailed.

Front corners has a glue blocks and a small molding block to the outside.

Front corners has a glue block and a small molding block on the outside. I wonder if the block is made or bought?

Looking at the feet from below, one of these is not like the others:

Not the first one.

Not the first one.

This one looks the same.

This one looks the same.

More of the same.

More of the same.

Must be this one. Who can tell me why this one is not like the others?

Must be this one. Who can tell me why this one is not like the others?

They all have the same caster.

They all have the same caster.

This is the only of the four tables that is held together with a bed bolt:

Not a bed but still a bed bolt.

Not a bed but a bed bolt?

There is one troubling repair that jumps right out and annoys me. Fortunately it is only visible from the bottom.

Phillips screws! Not period.

Phillips screws! Not historically correct.

We all know that the Phillips Screw Company was not formed until 1934, one hundred years after this table was made. (One of the first commercial uses or the Phillips screws was by General Motors for the Cadillac in 1936. The more you know…)

My research show that it is more likely he used Robertson (square) drive or Spax screws.

Maybe cut nails…