The last time I saw Peter Follansbee, he asked me when I was going to share pictures of some old things? He has a point. Whereas some youngsters might consider Mid-Century modern as old, Peter thinks more in terms of 17th century as contemporary.

Most of the furniture I stumble across is late 18th and 19th century. I see plenty of 20th and 21st century furniture but I tend to ignore it for the purposes of this blog. There are a few interesting (to me) modern pieces but not many.

Then there is this chest:

Not from Pier One.

Not from Pier One.

This chest has been at the localest (most local?) antiques malls. It was buried deep in the middle of a cluster of furniture and has slowly been working was out to the perimeter.

Now that its free, I can get some pictures and a blog out of it.

It is a jointed chest. Simple construction. Boards set into grooved legs:

No dovetails or framed panels.

No dovetails or framed panels.

Boards in to grooves.

Boards in to grooves. Looks like hand work to me.

Some grooves run a bit long.

Some grooves run a bit long.

Tusked tenons holding the lid together.

I don't think they are the original wedges in the tenons.

I don’t think they are the original wedges in the tenons.

Lid ends are tapered:

Interesting. I'm open to any explanations.

Interesting. I’m open to any explanations.

Lid attached with pintle hinges:

Right side, as originally built or repair.

Right side, as originally built or repair.

Left side, the same.

Left side, the same.

Interior is well worn:

IMG_3157

Case is decorated:

on the front,

on the front,

and lid.

and lid.

One other interesting feature is what one might call a belly rail. You can see the end of it in this view of the front:

There it is, low on the front.

There it is, low on the front.

And the view from below:

Held in place by the taper of the tenons on wither end.

Held in place by the taper of the tenons on wither end.

Still looking for more old stuff.

*Peter Follansbee specializes in 17th century period joinery and green woodworking.Peter Follansbee specializes in 17th century period joinery and green woodworking. He spent over 20 years making reproduction furniture at Plimoth Plantation, the living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts. In addition to teaching the craft at schools around the USA, Peter co-authored the book Make a Joint Stool from a Tree: An Introduction to 17th Century Joinery” with Jennie Alexander.