Genuine Reproduction Furniture!

There was actual reproduction furniture there. Like this pair of Formal Federal Tables:

They went for $325.

They went for $325.

I found this informative label in a drawer:

Every furniture maker should use something like this to explain how the world works to clients.

Every furniture maker could use something like this to explain how the world works to clients.

There were several cellarettes with and without internal dividers. I always thought that cellarettes without dividers were called sugar chests but what do I know?

This cellarette is typical of all the ones there.

This cellarette is typical of all the ones there.

They all have hand-cut dovetails

They all have hand-cut dovetails.

Then there is this cellarette:

 

Hand cut dovetails and nicely turned legs.

Hand cut dovetails and nicely turned legs.

Then you look at the back:

Fine high grade American plywood.

Fine high-grade American plywood.

Back in Would Duncan Phyfe have used Masonite® or Luan?, I explained my observations of furniture backs and materials used to make them. Worth a read.

The was something there I had never seen before at this or any other auction:

In the back gallery, they had entire rooms displays.

In the back gallery, they had entire rooms displays.

Your Aunt Edna's living room right out there in public.

Your Aunt Edna’s living room right out there in public.

Getting to the title item of this blog:

A Formal Biggs Secretary Bookcase, a reproduction.

A Formal Biggs Secretary Bookcase, a reproduction.

I used their picture because I forgot to take one. If I start taking pictures of details up close, I, on occasion, lose track of the fact I didn’t get the master shot. Fortunately, I had theirs to fall back on.

Based on all the galleries I've seen, this one is relatively bland.

Based on all the galleries I’ve seen, this one is relatively bland.

I grabbed the right document box to see how it was made and found it was not coming out. It wasn’t stuck or jammed but restrained. I pulled the left document box and it came out easily with light force. When I saw the back corner of the left box. I realized the right drawer was locked in place.

Document box with tell-tale locking hole at the back.

Document box with tell-tale locking hole at the back.

I pulled the top left drawer and found this:

A nicely executed locking system.

A nicely executed locking system. Turned knob/pin on a wood spring.

One problem with this locking system is that you have to pull then knob to lock the drawer as well as unlock it. No automatic locking.

I think it’s remarkable that a maker of reproduction furniture would add a secret compartment.  I’m going to keep looking for them in all furniture, old and new.