More like pie safes of the 15% but 1% has more punch.

Pie safes are one of those ubiquitous items that seem to be found in almost every antiques mall in the US. Just like those cobalt viobots (violin bottles) with ears (tuning pegs):


Referred to as a viobot to those in the know.

There is such a wide distribution of these two items that I have a theory that they are required, it not by law, then by the secret cabals that run all the antiques malls in 46 of the lower 48 states. (They’ve been driven out of New Hampshire and Oklahoma.)

Pie safes have been around since the 1700’s protecting high value foods from whatever pests and vermin that have chosen to dwell in the encompassing dwelling. I have a previous blog with too much information and too many pictures HERE.

Most pie safes look ordinary and plain, not unlike this one:


The pie safe ordinaire. Southern Punched Tin Painted Pie Safe. This lot has sold for $500.


The not-so-ordinaire punched tin.

But the elite 17% can’t be expected to use ordinary pie safes, they need something a bit more interesting. Because they can afford it.

Like this one:


Southern Punched Tin Food Safe from Virginia This lot has sold for $2200.


With more elaborate punched tins.

And since it is a superior pie safe, it has dovetailed drawers:


One steep pin with all its helpers, the nail family.

(It wouldn’t be my blog without dovetails.)

Another example:


Virginia Punched Tin Pie Safe. This lot has sold for $2000.


Punched tins on three sides.


Wedged dovetails, often a German thing. Looks like it might have been painted in the past.

And a fancy punched tin to match:


A more sophisticated fylfot design.

I worked very hard to find the word fylfot. I was trying to avoid swirling swastika or pinwheel. I knew the phonetics of the word but not the spelling. I looked at hundreds of images before I found a picture of the cover of Furniture in the Southern Style by Robert W. Lang and Glen D. Huey. Seeing the cover, I walked over to the bookshelf and found my copy, looked on page 144 and found the word fylfot. A quick google search showed me fylfot translates as swastika. Ya can’t win…

Fylfot was also used in the auction listing had I bothered to read it.

As we enter a new era, I wanted to show a pie safe from the other 17% as represented by this safe:


White Punched Tin Pie Safe. This lot has sold for $430. The pie safe for the rest of us.


This one has a punched tin on all four sides.


View from the inside shows the built up nature of this design.