From Wikipedia:

A Morris chair is an early type of reclining chair. The design was adapted by William Morris’s firm, Morris & Company, from a prototype owned by Ephraim Colman in rural Sussex, England. It was first marketed around 1866.

Morris chairs feature a seat with a reclining back and moderately high armrests, which give the chair an old-style appearance. The characteristic feature of a Morris chair is a hinged back, set between two un-upholstered arms.

Morris chair is a fairly flexible term. If you add the word Style, it becomes positively elastic.

Below are two from a recent auction. The first is considered a traditional Morris chair:

Morris Style Reclining Arm Chair

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This lot has sold for $160.

Description:  Circa 1900, mahogany and pine, transitional mission style frame, later paisley upholstered cushions.

For some reason the auctioneer listed this under Furniture – English and Continental.

It has a robust back adjust mechanism:

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Cut by hand of machine?

 

The other is more of the “Mission” or the “Craftsman” Morris chair. This one is listed under Furniture – American:

Morris Style Reclining Arm Chair

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This lot has sold for $80.

Description:  Circa 1900, later blue upholstery, oak frame, adjustable back with iron support bar, raised on shaped feet.

This back adjustment seems a bit less robust:

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Reminds me of a café curtain rod.

 

The content of this blog feels a bit light. I am obligated to add a few more chairs from the same auction. Third up is this chair just ready for you and your designer to make your own:

Queen Anne Wing Back Chair Frame

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This lot has sold for $310.

Description:   18th century frame, oak and other hardwoods, with later front cabriole legs.

One way to get rid of all the vermin in your horsehair stuffing.

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This is not a new frame…

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They haven’t quite found the right look yet,

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but as long as there is wood left, they’ll keep trying.

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This patch/support is actually a wood insert. It would be hard to nail into metal.

 

And one last chair to round things out. Or, in this case, a pair of chairs:

Pair of Transitional Carved Arm Chairs

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This lot has sold for $400.

Description:  Early 20th century, mahogany, floral needlepoint over upholstery, bowed arms terminating in eagle head, legs with acanthus carved knee and ball and claw foot.

One of a pair, the other looks just like it.

What really amused me about these chairs are the carved arms:

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The auctioneer claims they are eagles.

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Who am I to argue?