A rather well-known author/publisher/editor/woodworker/furniture maker/journalist/educator/entrepreneur/raconteur/anarchist/cicerone/father/husband has now gotten two blogs out of something I found and shared with him. Now,  it’s my turn.

It all started with a unique pair of winding sticks I found near Charleston, SC. I was told there are no tools to be found in the Charleston area but I am too stubborn/stupid to listen and went out looking. To be fair, I wasn’t only looking for tools and there weren’t all that many to find.

But find them I did and these are them:

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The famous/infamous half-moon winding sticks.

Taking a closer  look reveals some interesting details:

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Up close and personal.

First piece of revelatory information is that we have been using the wrong terminology. These are not winding sticks, they are wood levelers. A knowledgeable dealer would not go through all the trouble of writing the wrong name on the label of an item he/she wishes to sell.

The second is not really that important and I am not going to waste your time making you read something that is unimportant and uninteresting.

This was not my first set of wood levelers. My first set was a purchase from Lee Valley for a saw bench class taught by Chris Schwarz at Roy Underhill’s Woodwright’s School in Pittsboro, NC. I bought them because the levelers were on the tools list that was sent out three days before the class. I was out-of-town on business and would be getting home just in time to pack my tools and head out on the long 0.57 hour drive south.

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They are extruded. And not wood.

I did take some abuse from the instructor for having store-bought, aluminum levelers. I worked through the shame and humiliation, after all, better abused than ignored.

The next set I made when I got a really good deal on some thin hardwood strips:

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Unclean. I used power tool to make these.

My fourth set came from a toolmaking class I took from the aforementioned Chris Schwarz at Highland Woodworking in Atlanta. This was his classic layout tool class, hand tools only.

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Sapele. Only hand tools used. Really. The reversing grain made it a challenge to plane. Maybe there was a reason Highland Woodworking provided us this wood.

Which is my favorite set? I use them all equally.

I might repost this post with better pictures. Then again, I might not.

If you want, you can read those other blogs HERE and HERE.