I was talking to Peter Follansbee about life, woodworking and this blog when he asked my why I didn’t take pictures of anything really old? My threshold for old is pre-McKinley (1900) while Mr. Follansbee’s is 16th century. The obvious answer is that the places I have access to don’t often have anything old. The number of Empire chests-of-drawers far exceeds the number of jointed English stools in the retail/auction market.

To address Mr. Follansbee’s concerns, I offer here two dealer-confirmed old pieces. I completely trust antiques dealers. What possible incentive would they have to lie or deceive?

Is it a cupboard if it was built before cups were invented? Could it be a jelly if all they had was preserves? It’s that old:


It’s a really old cabinet of some sort.


They told me that the door is as old as the rest of the cabinet.


Hand forged pintle hinges.


Even the drop pull is hand forged.

Equally old or even older is this chest:


More frame and panel construction. They didn’t have wide boards back then.


A coopered domed lid with a hand hewn rib.


A primitive hinge notched for leg clearance.


This lock (interior view)


is held on with clinched nails.


Looking at the end, somebody really liked their beading plane. Note the through tenons on the legs.