This is another situation were we need some Federal regulation as to the standardization of furniture terminology to avoid confusion and indicate the actual use and derivation of a furniture type. It is commonly called the corner chair but there is not indication that these types of chairs were used  exclusively in corners:

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Circa 1740 – 1765, probably made near Dover, Delaware. From the Biggs Museum of American Art in Dover.

There is speculation that this design was meant to allow men wearing sword to sit comfortably. Many doubt this. It can also be called a writing chair, a smoking chair, a roundabout chair or simply Edgar. My personal belief is that exist to promulgate manspread.

There are many variations of corner chairs out there. The common design elements are that the legs are rotated 45° from typical, the side legs continue up to become the arm supports and that the chair arm goes from one side leg to the other. I now believe that some of those odd chairs I came across are just corner chair variants.

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A previously undiscovered variant or mutant, if you will.

Some are more functional:

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A wide apron indicates it probably concealed a chamber pot. From Winterthur.

Some are more elaborate than others:

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Twists and splats and beads, oh my.

Some aren’t rounded:

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This one would fit well into a corner.

Some are less than utilitarian:

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Ugly with a certain lack of grace.

Some are more modern in their approach:

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With a touch of Asian influence.

Whatever they are and however they’re made, you can find more in a photo set HERE.