I Think This One is Old.

The last time I saw Peter Follansbee, he asked me when I was going to share pictures of some old things? He has a point. Whereas some youngsters might consider Mid-Century modern as old, Peter thinks more in terms of 17th century as contemporary.

Most of the furniture I stumble across is late 18th and 19th century. I see plenty of 20th and 21st century furniture but I tend to ignore it for the purposes of this blog. There are a few interesting (to me) modern pieces but not many.

Then there is this chest:

Not from Pier One.

Not from Pier One.

This chest has been at the localest (most local?) antiques malls. It was buried deep in the middle of a cluster of furniture and has slowly been working was out to the perimeter.

Now that its free, I can get some pictures and a blog out of it.

It is a jointed chest. Simple construction. Boards set into grooved legs:

No dovetails or framed panels.

No dovetails or framed panels.

Boards in to grooves.

Boards in to grooves. Looks like hand work to me.

Some grooves run a bit long.

Some grooves run a bit long.

Tusked tenons holding the lid together.

I don't think they are the original wedges in the tenons.

I don’t think they are the original wedges in the tenons.

Lid ends are tapered:

Interesting. I'm open to any explanations.

Interesting. I’m open to any explanations.

Lid attached with pintle hinges:

Right side, as originally built or repair.

Right side, as originally built or repair.

Left side, the same.

Left side, the same.

Interior is well worn:

IMG_3157

Case is decorated:

on the front,

on the front,

and lid.

and lid.

One other interesting feature is what one might call a belly rail. You can see the end of it in this view of the front:

There it is, low on the front.

There it is, low on the front.

And the view from below:

Held in place by the taper of the tenons on wither end.

Held in place by the taper of the tenons on wither end.

Still looking for more old stuff.

*Peter Follansbee specializes in 17th century period joinery and green woodworking.Peter Follansbee specializes in 17th century period joinery and green woodworking. He spent over 20 years making reproduction furniture at Plimoth Plantation, the living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts. In addition to teaching the craft at schools around the USA, Peter co-authored the book Make a Joint Stool from a Tree: An Introduction to 17th Century Joinery” with Jennie Alexander.

 

Why Four?

I was recently asked if I was trying to corner the market for Thomas Day game tables? Why did I need four Thomas Day game tables? Obvious answers: too much time and money, no impulse control.

While true, it is not the whole truth.

Thomas Day was/is a compelling person. He was a third generation free man of color and the largest furniture maker in pre-Civil War North Carolina. And a slave owner. You can read an NPR article about him HERE.

I saw an alleged Thomas Day game table on eBay and watched the auction. Reasonably priced but shipping was high and I had no way of knowing if it actually was as claimed. Auction ended with no sale. I watched it on its next listing. And again on its third. I took time to read the listing and realized the table was located within five miles of my house.

I contacted the seller to see if the table was going to be offered again. He responded that he was done with eBay but there was a woman from South Carolina coming to take look at it. He said I was free to come look at it if I wanted. I wanted and scheduled a visit inviting my friend, Jerome Bias, to come view it with me.

We came, we saw, we were skeptical. The seller was quite insistent and knew all the right people in the collector community. We talked and turned the table every which way to look for evidence either way. In the end, Jerome’s skepticism lost to my desire to own. A price was negotiated and the table followed me home. The lady from South Carolina, if she existed, never made an appearance.

A few weeks later, I took the table to Martin O’Brien, a highly respected conservator of furniture in Winston-Salem. We stared and talked for a while. His belief is that there is very good chance it is a Thomas Day piece. Or he said that hoping that he could make this fairly large odd person go away.

I found the second table in Hudson, NC. I took lots of pictures and compared it to the first. There were more similarities than differences. I thought about it for a few weeks but finally gave in to the paranoia that it might be bought by someone who didn’t realize what it might be. I drove back to Hudson and acquired it. The dealer was having a sale. I paid substantially less for this one than the first. The first wasn’t that expensive to begin with.

Jerome told me about the third one at a Greensboro antiques mall. I picked it up while driving back from Martin O’Brien’s shop. I was there to allow him to examine the second table. We decided the second was likely a Day piece. The mall gave me 15% off for paying cash for the third. I paid less for the third one than the second.

The fourth one was at a large antiques mall in Burlington. Again, many of the same features as the first three. The dealer had marked it down so, once again, I paid less than for the third.

I own these four with the intent of offering them up for study. I would like to work with a group or museum to offer the chance to study them with other known pieces of Day furniture. See the evolution of design and construction, techniques and materials. A chance to learn more about early 19th century furniture.

Eventually, I want to find a home for the tables. Give others a chance to see and study them. They need to go. Eventually. We have a large house but it’s not infinitely large. I have no intention of becoming a Thomas Day hoarder.

One thing I have learned is that Mr. Day’s method of foot attachment is subject to failure. He makes a load bearing joint from an end-grain to end-grain glue joint reinforced with a single dowel.

Yellow glue works best when it is thick enough to measure. With a yardstick.

A repaired joint. Just not well repaired.

This failure is seen on most of the tables:

Imminent failure.

Imminent failure.

Hanging in there by a dowel.

Hanging in there by a dowel.

On the other hand, the tables have survived for over 150 years. How long should a joint last to be considered a success?

Four

I think I might have mentioned that I recently picked up my fourth Thomas Day game table. Or, at least, what I believe is a Thomas Day game table. Lacking manufacturer’s markings or any direct link back to the original owner, it can only be said it is consistent with his designs, techniques, materials and geography.

To recap, his is the first one I came across a little over a year ago:

You always remember your first.

You always remember your first.

Then, two and three:

Or is it three and two.

Or is it three and two?

Here is number four found at a local antiques mall for which I either paid too little or too much:

Ta-da!

Ta-da!

The now familiar foot:

Dainty yet sturdy.

Dainty yet sturdy.

Same transitional molding:

Graceful.

Graceful.

Unique stanchions…

with a heart.

with a heart.

Nice veneer on the top:

I would like to be able to do this.

I would like to be able to do this.

Less interesting on the inside:

Interesting veneer costs more:

Interesting veneer costs more. Still nice but less so.

Top view of the structure.

Top view of the structure.

Cross member is dovetailed to the frame.

Cross member is dovetailed to the frame.

Back of the frame is dovetailed.

Back of the frame is dovetailed.

Front corners has a glue blocks and a small molding block to the outside.

Front corners has a glue block and a small molding block on the outside. I wonder if the block is made or bought?

Looking at the feet from below, one of these is not like the others:

Not the first one.

Not the first one.

This one looks the same.

This one looks the same.

More of the same.

More of the same.

Must be this one. Who can tell me why this one is not like the others?

Must be this one. Who can tell me why this one is not like the others?

They all have the same caster.

They all have the same caster.

This is the only of the four tables that is held together with a bed bolt:

Not a bed but still a bed bolt.

Not a bed but a bed bolt?

There is one troubling repair that jumps right out and annoys me. Fortunately it is only visible from the bottom.

Phillips screws! Not period.

Phillips screws! Not historically correct.

We all know that the Phillips Screw Company was not formed until 1934, one hundred years after this table was made. (One of the first commercial uses or the Phillips screws was by General Motors for the Cadillac in 1936. The more you know…)

My research show that it is more likely he used Robertson (square) drive or Spax screws.

Maybe cut nails…

 

Reflections on a Day at The Woodworking Show

I said I was going to The Woodworking Show in Baltimore (Timonium, actually). I bought a ticket. I drove north. I went. The blog is my reflections and opinions on attending said show.

On Saturday, The Show opened at 10:00 AM. I arrived at around 10:10 expecting an empty parking lot at the Maryland State Fairgrounds. To my annoyance, the lot was close to 70% full. Most people were not there for the children’s toy and clothing sale in the FH/Home Arts building. Most seemed to be heading to the Cow Palace, weekend venue of The Woodworking Show.

I don’t like crowds but I had come too far to turn back. I trundled on. Like other woodworking events, the attendees are closer to Medicare than college. Trundling is an appropriate description for how we all moved.

Arriving at the Cow Palace, the vendor area seems about the same size as the vendor area at Woodworking In America, my only frame of reference for woodworking shows. The area was the same but the vendor mix was different. Lee Valley/Veritas represented the high-end of the hand tool world. No Lie-Nielsen or Scott Meeks Woodworks or Bad Axe Toolworks or Vesper Tools. Or Stumpy Nubs Woodworking!? Or Lost Arts Press.

There were more local clubs and flea market tool vendors. Oddly there were people selling kitchen and bath remodels, gutter guards, basement waterproofing and food services.

There were things I never saw at WIA like Wood Magazine and Fine Woodworking Magazine. I think I have only seen Popular Woodworking at WIA. Matt, Mike, something to think about.

Also there were the good people from 360 Woodworking. They were there giving instructional seminars (free) and promoting their site and memberships there of. All people giving free seminars were there educating and promoting their company. This might explain why this show was $10 and WIA is over $400.

360 Woodworking’s sessions were all about building a simple wall mounted cabinet one hour at a time. 45 minutes at a time if you back out self-promotion. Here are the boys men at work:

Chuck Bender and Glen Huey of 360 Woodworking. Chuck is the smart one and Glen is the good looking one.

Chuck Bender and Glen Huey of 360 Woodworking. Chuck is the smart one. Glen is the good looking one. I think.

They have some unique approaches to common woodworking tasks. Here is Chuck with an improvised router table:

A board screwed to a Porter Cable 690 clamped in a vise. I don't know if he is using a fixed or plunge base.

A board screwed to a Porter Cable 690 router clamped in a vise. I don’t know if he is using a fixed or plunge base.

The image is a bit fuzzy due to me using the digital zoom on my iPhone. I didn’t want to get too close.

The 690 has two flat spot on the shell that house the motor’s brushes. This is how he clamps it in the vise.

The 690. I really want a Festool 1400 but my 690 won't die.

The PC 690. I really want a Festool 1400 but my 690 just won’t die.

Only vaguely troubling artifact of The Show was Miss Makita, an attractive woman in a midriff revealing shirt. There is also a Señorita Makita who must have been revealing her midriff elsewhere. Collectively, they are referred to as the Makita Girls.

How retro…

I was curious to see who responds to this type of display, so I stood there for a few hours to observe. Not true. With my ADD, anything over 5 minutes would be impossible to believe. The few times I did walk by, the only people I saw leering were two male vendors from an adjacent booth. Either we have evolved beyond it or we are better at leering covertly.

If The Woodworking Show comes to a Cow Palace near you, you should go. I you have $400 and some free time in September, go to Woodworking In America. All the cool geezers do.

 

The Most Interesting Thing I’ve Seen This Year

That’s not really saying much. After all, it was only day eight of the new year and I haven’t been anywhere interesting yet. I was in Baltimore to visit friends and attend The Woodworking Show at the state fairgrounds.

(Really selling this, ain’t I?)

It was Saturday afternoon and I was having trouble hearing the gentleman proclaiming his oil and sanding system the finest in the land over the noise from the router demonstration to my left and the CNC router behind me. It was crowded all day and getting worse by the hour. It was time to be somewhere else.

Reluctantly, I left.

Time and changing markets have largely decimated the antiquing opportunities in Cockeysville. Many of the downtown dealers are gone. One new and happening antique area seems to be in the Hampden neighborhood.

When I lived in the area, Hampden was a working class neighborhood mostly famous for the annual Miracle on 34th Street, a block of over-the-top light displays loosely linked to a holiday in late December. All houses contribute in their own competitive way. Hampden is now trendy with trendy hair salons, trendy restaurants and trendy shops filled with hipsters and other questionable sorts.

There be man-buns!

This is my kind of neighborhood. Of course I had to go.

And I went. Nothing earth-shaking but a collection of small shops with some interesting stuff. One of the interesting pieces is what was described as an English adjustable partner’s drafting desk:

Looks ordinary.

Looks ordinary.

Center section has around 18" of vertical adjustment.

Center section has around 18″ of vertical adjustment.

Two independently adjustable writing surfaces.

Two independently adjustable writing surfaces.

Really nice rule joints. Someone should write an article.

Really nice rule joints. Someone should write an article.

First dovetailed drawer of the new year.

First dovetailed drawer of the new year. One just like it on the other side.

The lock's bolt is centered but the keyhole isn't.

The lock’s bolt is centered but the keyhole isn’t.

Shelf is dovetailed as well. Quality work.

Shelf is dovetailed as well. Quality work. Also shown is how the vertical adjustments are made.

A view from the left for balance.

A view from the left for balance.

Traveling to Baltimore, I came across what is the oddest thing I’ve seen in a while:

A three-legged staked bench on rails with a desk.

A three-legged staked stool on rails with a desk.

Looks odd from the other side, too.

Looks odd from the other side, too.

It took me a while to figure out what it is. A friend gave me a suggestion and I did some research. I believe this is the (believed) mythical sled desk use by nomadic home-schooled Inuit children. Learning al fresco. Curved ends of the skis are missing but I’m sure I ‘m right. This was before seat belts.

The final oddity for today is this pseudo-staked bench from IKEA, the Swedish meatball people:

Looks staked but is it really?

Looks staked but is it really?

Aggregate wood. IKEA makes wood the way McDonalds makes McNuggets only with more glue and less pressure but more glue.

Aggregate wood. IKEA makes wood the way McDonalds makes McNuggets only with more glue but less pressure.

I Deliver

I’m sitting in a hotel room north of Baltimore as I write this. I lived in the Baltimore area for about 20 years so this is like coming home without the cats and wife. I’m here to deliver these two cabinets:

I finally finished two.

I finally finished two.

You might (or might not) remember these from Hi, I’m Don and One of My Least Favorite Words Has Its Uses. To recap, for reasons best explained as OCD, I built six cabinets like this in three different sizes. These are based on a cabinet from the Woodsmith public TV series. Saying I built them is slightly misleading. Six of these exist in various states of completion. Well, I did actually finish these two. After all, I’m delivering them.

I wasn’t expecting to build six when I started. It just happened. I built them from white and yellow pine for budgetary reasons. These cabinets take close to 30 board feet of lumber. The construction grade pine came in for less than a dollar per board foot. Poplar, oak or maple would have come in at $3 to $4 per board foot. I wasn’t expecting to finish any of them. I blew only about $160 vs. $720 if I had used real wood.

These two turned out better than I thought they would considering I was using them for examples and prototypes. I almost regret the pine. The ones others built using poplar and oak were much more attractive. It is what it is.

The hardware might have been a better idea than reality as well. I don’t know about you but if I spend too much time on a project, I lose objectivity. I lose touch with the aesthetic aspects of the project and become fixated on the technical.

I am delivering them to some younger friends that just bought a house and don’t have much in the way of furniture. My hope is these cabinets end up in the shop or garage. Not any place with adequate lighting and moderate to high foot traffic. Some day I’ll prove I can do better work.

While here, I will also be visiting Glen Huey and Chuck Bender from 360 Woodworking. They are in town for The Woodworking Show at the fairgrounds. They are stuck in their booth and can’t run away.

Driving home Sunday, I will pick up what I believe is my fifth Thomas Day game table. It might be my sixth. I have one that is still of uncertain ancestry. My wife doesn’t read my blog. I’m safe for now.

My second and third Thomas Day game tables.

My second and third Thomas Day game tables.

I know where there are four more but the dealers want more money than I am willing to pay.

A Romantic Notion

There is a walking path in our development that I tend to avoid for most of the year. It runs through wooded areas in front of the houses and common areas. April through November every time I use it I am either the first or the tallest person to walk it. Spider webs. I don’t enjoy walking through spider webs. North Carolina has very industrious spider that are prolific web spinners. I am still ten years too young to be seen yelling and swinging walking stick in public.

I usually stay on the road.

On one of those rare occasions I used the path, I saw something off in the woods that piqued my curiosity. It looked like a car. Why would there be a car in the woods? There was a question that needed to be answered. I trespassed and wandered over to explore.

It wasn’t a car. Research informs me that it is a 1964 Falcon-based Ford Ranchero. Well, big parts of it:

1964 Ranchero body.

1964 Ranchero body.

Copied and pasted from Wikipedia:

The Ford Ranchero is a coupe utility that was produced by Ford between 1957 and 1979. Unlike a pickup truck, the Ranchero was adapted from a two-door station wagon platform that integrated the cab and cargo bed into the body. A total of 508,355 units were produced during the model’s production run. It was adapted from full-size, compact and intermediate automobiles sold by Ford for the North American market.

Most of this I knew. This I didn’t know:

The Ford Ranchero sold well enough to spawn a competitor from General Motors in 1959, the Chevrolet El Camino.

I always thought the El Camino came first.

I walked around and surveyed the derelict coupe utility. Some parts were missing:

Doors. Do you really need doors.

Doors. Do you really need doors?

Seats are overrated.

Seats are a crutch.

Steering wheel and gauges are there.

Steering wheel and gauges are there.

Grill is there but you would need head lights.

Grill is there but you would need head lights.

Meet the 144 cu. in. Thriftpower I6 (Straight 6).

Meet the 144 cu. in. Thriftpower I6 (Straight 6). Much of it.

Back end needs a bit of work.

Back end needs a bit of work.

In 1982, this car was permitted for St. Pauls, NC, around 120 south of its current location.

Expired, I presume.

Expired, I presume.

By 1984, it was being parked in Apex, NC, a suburb of the Raleigh-Durham area.

Driving a 20 year old Ranchero to high school.

Driving a 20-year-old Ranchero to high school?

How would your peers view you driving a 1964 Ranchero to high school in 1985? Was it old enough to be considered “retro” and cool? Was it parked in the far corner with the hope nobody would notice? Or in 1985, were you happy to have a car and lucky to be able to get a parking pass. Times change.

It is possible that this vehicle has been sitting here for up to 30 years. Looking at the caliper of the trees, it’s been here quite a while. What’s left of the body is in surprisingly good condition.

If one is a consumer of basic cable, one might think restoring this relic would be fun and profitable. In 24 minutes, this Ranchero can be returned to showroom pristine or converted to a pimped out chick/dude magnet.

I thought about restoring it for the rest of the walk. And decided against it. Here are the issues as I see them.

  1. I would need to use the VIN to locate the owner. Or if the owner cannot be located, I would need to get an abandoned vehicle title.
  2. Talk to the property owner to get permission to cut a few trees to get the Ranchero out or talk to my HOA and convince them that cutting down trees is a good thing.
  3. Rent a garage. I have a two-car garage but if I used it, I would have to park my car outside and tell my wife I bought it.
  4. Get it towed there.
  5. Locate parts for a 50-year-old Ford.
  6. And then there’s the engine.
  7. Wiring harnesses.
  8. Seat or seats.
  9. Wheels, tires and brakes.
  10. Bodywork.
  11. Paint.

And then when I’m all done six months to two years later, all I have is a 1964 Falcon-based Ford Ranchero. A ’64 Ranchero can be purchased for $7,000 to $21,000 depending on condition and gullibility. It doesn’t really make sense.

Much of what we do doesn’t make sense. Doesn’t mean it’s wrong. It means we need to understand why we do it. What we do doesn’t always make sense.

This is what a 1964 Ranchero looks like:

"1964 Ford Ranchero Pickup" by Sicnag - 1964 Ford Ranchero Pickup. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1964_Ford_Ranchero_Pickup.jpg#/media/File:1964_Ford_Ranchero_Pickup.jpg

“1964 Ford Ranchero Pickup” by Sicnag – 1964 Ford Ranchero Pickup. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1964_Ford_Ranchero_Pickup.jpg#/media/File:1964_Ford_Ranchero_Pickup.jpg

I’m not going to fetch and restore the Ranchero. If any of you are interested, I have a lead on the missing air cleaner:

Write or call for details.

Write or call for details.

My Visit to the Swiss National Museum

We are at the point in our life when traveling we don’t enjoy getting off one eight-hour flight just to get on another one. If we don’t have to, we don’t. So we didn’t.

On our way to South Africa, we paused and spent three nights in Zürich. Days, too. It’s amazing how much of a city you can see when with the proper motivation. In our case, not knowing if we would ever have a chance to visit Zürich again. When choosing a place to visit, there is the “that was nice, let’s go back” vs. the “that was nice, where haven’t we been yet” discussion. We work hard to see as much as we can assuming we might not be back.

The Swiss National Museum was a good use of out time. Lots to see and much of it in my (our?) area of interests. The main floor has a collection of medieval wood carvings and altar retables:

Like this.

Like this. Combines religious art and wagon technology.

Great carving for a higher purpose.

Carving for a higher purpose.

Great works of religious art...

Great works of religious art…

and I feel the need to document the joinery.

and I feel the need to document the joinery. Interesting hinge.

First floor has paintings and sculpture, fashion and textiles, technology and traditions and metals.

The second floor is largely furnishings and interiors.

A large collections of staked chairs.

A large collections of staked chairs.

Just your ordinary, everyday carved chest.

Just your ordinary, everyday carved chest.

Some relocated interiors with special attention paid to heating systems.

Some relocated interiors with special attention paid to heating systems.

If you liked that one, you'll love this one.

If you liked that one, you’ll love this one.

This visit has been previously been reported in I’ve Run Out of Things to See in the US and Roubo in ZürichRemember the period rooms?

Everybody's favorite, the 1927 room.

Everybody’s favorite, the 1927 room.

And speaking of icons:

This chair means a great deal to a select few.

This chair means a great deal to a select few.

If a trip to Zürich is not in your immediate future, you can look at my pictures HERE.

It’s something…

 

 

n

But First, A Few Words About Arkansas…

It has been brought to my attention that I might have offended some fans of Arkansas with my blog yesterday. No offense was intended. To the best of my knowledge I have only been to Arkansas twice and both of those visits ended well.

The first time was in April of 1984. We were working in Memphis, TN and decided we needed to get some more floppy disks. We weren’t desperate; we just thought it would be a good idea to have spares. We called around and found a box of 8″ hard sectored, double-sided, double-density floppies at the Radio Shack® at the mall in West Memphis, Arkansas. We drove over there and bought them. It was pleasantly uneventful. A good time was had by all.

An interesting (to me) bit of trivia about our computer. We were using an LSI-11, a DEC PDP-11 only smaller. We were big time in that we had two 8″ floppy drives. If we traveled out of the US to a country with 50Hz power, we had to change the drive belt and pulleys on the drives. Things have changed.

The other time I recall being in Arkansas was April 2nd, 2013. We were driving back from California and stopped at the McDonald’s in Forrest City, Arkansas to do what one does when one stops at a McDonald’s in Forrest City. One NPR commentator described vacations moving gallons of Diet Coke from one McDonald’s to the next.

This McDonald’s impressed me because the seating was all genuine Emeco Navy chairs.

All genuine Emeco Navy chairs and variants.

All genuine Emeco Navy chairs and variants.

For those not in the know, the Navy chair is an iconic piece of Americana. From the Emeco web site:

First built for use on submarines in 1944, the Navy Chair has been in continuous production ever since. With the famous 77 step Process, our craftsmen take soft, recycled aluminum, hand form and weld it – then temper it for strength. Finally, the chair is anodized for a durable finish. We guarantee the Navy Chairs for life.

I have my own Navy chair:

Everyone should have one as a part of their basic Americana collection.

Everyone should have one as a part of their basic Americana collection.

So, you see, I have nothing but good things to say about Arkansas. My blog yesterday was just referring to the Norman Rockwell-like childhood of a well-known flip-flop wearing tool expert. The kind of simple, off-the-grid, bucolic existence we all wish we could read about somebody else living.

I’m Not Sure I Believe It.

I’m not a tool collector. I know I’ve said it before, but I’m not. I believe it goes to intent. I do not go out with the intent of acquiring tools. It’s an organic process. It just happens. I see something that might be considered a tool, it speaks to me and then follows me home.

Such is the case with my latest purchase. I was recently sentenced to Las Vegas for a week. It was for business or more importantly for the check. And the per diem. I had some free time and did a tour of the usual antiques shop. Nothing great but it is more interesting than sitting around the hotel. I saw a saw that looked interesting, took a few pictures, put it back and walked away. I couldn’t quite make out the logo or manufacturer’s name on the blade.

I went back to the hotel and did some research. Within a few minutes I discovered the saw maker and the pedigree of the saw. I was hooked. When I knew nothing about the saw, it didn’t matter. Once I knew its history, I was sunk. It was over. I was out $41.00 less 15% (sale) plus 8.1% state sales tax. $37.67 or so.

Here is the saw:

Interesting saw, no?

Interesting saw, no?

The blade moves:

It moves up.

It goes up and down.

And you can take the blade out:

A back saw without the saw part.

A back saw without the saw part.

The blade has teeth on three edges. 12 ppi on one long edge, 8 ppi on the other.

The teeth on the end of the blade engages in the frame to lock it into place. Not for cutting.

The teeth on the end of the blade engage the frame to lock it into place. Not for cutting.

The handle has a lever to set tension on the blade and lock it in:

it locks the blade at the selected depth with the preferred teeth.

it locks the blade at the selected depth with the preferred teeth.

Bottom view.

Bottom view.

When I got the saw back to my room I did more research and confirmed what I though.

The saw is by Shapleigh Hardware of St. Lois, MO.

The saw is by Shapleigh Hardware of St. Lois, MO. as stated on the blade with their Diamond Edge slogan below.

This saw’s intent was to be two saws in one. For instance, a rip and a crosscut. Just flip the blade over, what could be easier? One could also set depth of cut by moving the blade up and down. Having played with the saw a bit, I think two saws would have been a better use of their money.

Lee Valley/Veritas has an article about the Bishop’s Patent Saw in their newsletter. Only four short pages, a quick read.

As long as we are speaking tool, I want to rant about this picture I saw in a magazine recently:

This bothers me, inappropriate foot ware.

This bothers me, inappropriate footwear.

This picture must have been in either Garden and Gun or Field and Stream magazine. No legal team at any respectable woodworking magazine would allow flip-flops to be worn by somebody using power tools any more than they would allow pictures of a table saw being used without a blade guard and riving knife. Technically, he/she is not in the shop, but still…

It looks like the kind of thing you would see in Arkansas but for the fact they look more like mall flip-flops and not the ones you would get at your local dollar store.

The other major safety issue with this picture is missing accessories. There is the following label on every DeWalt DW735 planer:

Read and understand all safety information before using power tools. Hand tools, too.

Read and understand all safety information before using power tools. Hand tools, too.

I don’t see either a dust collector or a dust chute.

Dust chute, DeWalt 5140011-49

Dust chute, DeWalt 5140011-49, available from your local DeWalt dealer or online.

Can you image the lawsuit if the improperly protected feet came in contact with the exposed fan?

Not pretty.

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