The Rest of the Story: I Just Keep Finding ’em, Part II.

See, they rearranged the screens. Publish is where Save Draft used to be. Sun was in my eyes. Barking dog distracted me.

I screwed up.

As I was saying, the other desk is this perfectly lovely slant front desk:

Oh, look. A desk.

Oh, look. A desk.

Notice there is no drawers between the lopers:

Drawers are a requirement either.

Drawers aren’t a requirement either.

A quick look at the gallery reveals a suspicious area surrounded by a gap.

Gee, I wonder what's in the middle there?

Gee, I wonder what’s in the middle there?

And, of course, the center slides back to reveal a storage area.

A good place to secure that which must be secures.

A good place to secure that which must be secured.

There are more of the facade drawers:

These are smaller than the others,

These are smaller than the others,

This drawer isn’t secret but I thought the drawer front was interesting:

Notice the grain direction. Good way to maximize drawer strength.

Notice the grain direction. Good way to maximize drawer strength.

And now you know…

The rest of the story.

A full set of pictures from this visit shortly.

I Just Keep Finding ’em.

I wasn’t looking for more secret compartments. On the other hand, I wasn’t not looking for them. Neither is true, I was and am looking for them.

And I found more. At the same consignment/antiques shop as the last set. Those were May of 2014. These are from Sunday. On the way back from the flea market.

First up is this bookcase on secretary:

A handsome piece if ever there was one.

A handsome piece if ever there was one.

Gallery is what you would expect except the prospect lacks a door:

Another gallery in another secretary. I've seen so many.

Another gallery in another secretary. I’ve seen so many.

Prospect does seem odd with no door:

There are no requirements that prospects have doors. They just usually do.

There are no requirements that prospects have doors. They just usually do.

I noticed that the floor of the prospect was not well fitted and warped. Turns out it is removable:

With storage below. There is no requirement that prospects floors be firmly attached.

With storage below. There is no requirement that prospect floors be firmly attached. They just by convention are.

And the facade (arcade?) is actually a drawer:

Actually fairly common but not universal.

Actually fairly common but not universal.

We all know about the document drawers.

Almost a requirement. And we all know about them.

Almost a requirement. They come in pairs. Almost always.

Been There. Done That.

Over to Popular Woodworking, I just read a blog about the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass. I can’t remember who wrote the blog. I think it was that tall guy. Hirsute. Glasses. Used to be an editor there. Name is Topher Dulyn or something to that effect. If I remember, I’ll edit this crap out.

I read the blog and remembered I was there in December and wrote a blog about the Nathaniel Gould exhibit titled Nathaniel Gould Was Not a Bodger, He Fitted Skillfully. The exhibit was titled In Plain Sight: Discovering the Furniture of Nathaniel Gould. I will publish all my pictures from the exhibit in the next day or two.

Today’s blog is about the furniture in the permanent collection. I have pictures of the same furniture that Topher has in his blog. His blog is all about showing pictures of people with the furniture having a good time and being impressed. I really have no interest in pictures of people. I have 26,209 pictures in my iPhoto library with maybe 20 pictures with people in them. Then only because I got tired of waiting for them to walk out of frame. We have different priorities.

I was going to post all these pictures in December but other things came up and they got lost in the mess that December became. It was a very odd December and I will tell all shortly. Or not.

Moving on, here are some common pictures. There is this table without Phil Lowe:

It looks so lonely here.

It looks so lonely here.

More no Phil:

Nobody in the mirror either.

Nobody in the mirror either.

I do have this leg detail:

More of a frame detail, actually.

More of a frame detail, actually.

No Phil, Peter Follansbee might be more appropriate:

Looks old, must be why it's in a museum.

Looks old, must be why it’s in a museum.

And this one:

I don't think he had the chair.

He had the chair, too. Must be a set.

For my preview, I will add a painted chest:

No charge, consider it a gift.

No charge, consider it a gift.

To see all my Peabody Essex Museum, follow this LINK.

AT&T is Deploying the Latest Technology

Cutting edge sun umbrella.

Cutting edge sun umbrella.

As long time readers should know, I am not a fan of AT&T. We have AT&T DSL at the house. Almost 1.2 Mbps down and a blazing 0.18 Mbps up. When people started moving into the neighborhood nine years ago this was a reasonable speed for the country. BellSouth assured people that high speed fiber would be installed within two years. Nine years later, AT&T has said that we might have fiber within two years and certainly by 2020, their target date for eliminating copper.

And they have raised my rate three times in the past 18 months.

We are now in negotiations to split the construction costs with a cable provider to bring service into our little enclave. Shows you how bad it is that we are willing to bribe a cable company just to get rid of AT&T.

Eight miles from here, Google is planning on deploying gigabit fiber in Carrboro and Chapel Hill. AT&T is deploying sun umbrellas.

Update

To be fair, I drove by their pedestals today and the umbrella is gone. They have replaced it with an improvised awning,

How AT&T defines progress.

How AT&T defines progress.

Now That’s a Bit Odd.

Wandered over to the flea market at the State Fairgrounds in Raleigh today. North Carolina has few good flea markets. Most of them seem to be places for entry-level entrepreneurs to sell boots, truck parts, car stereos and nearly expired food. Way up North, these exist but a good many flea markets exist to sell antiques, vintage and collectibles I miss Northern flea markets. I don’t miss Northern winters.

I saw a few odd things here today. First is a tamboured expanding table:

A table with a tambour in the middle.

A table with a tambour in the middle.

I have seen drop leaf tables, draw leaf tables, leaf tables and leaf-less tables. This one has a tambour where the leaf ought to be.

A tambour in dappled sunlight.

A tambour in dappled sunlight.

Here is a look at the table runners. You draw the table ends out pulling the tambour out from its storage location in the center of the table.

An interesting idea whose time has come and gone.

An interesting idea whose time has come and gone.

Next thing I saw was this plane variant:

But what is it?

But what is it?

And another view.

This view doesn't really answer any questions.

This view doesn’t really answer any questions.

Let’s face this head on:

Well, it is a Stanley.

Well, it is a Stanley.

After doing some research, I believe it is a Stanley #35 transitional smoothing plane that has had its wooden sole turned into a round.

It followed me home.

The factory standard Stanley 35 transitional plane.

The factory standard Stanley 35 transitional plane.

The third and final item is this box that looks familiar.

Another one of these boxes.

Another one of these boxes.

More views.

IMG_2323

IMG_2322

What makes this box special is its similarities to the boxes in Cousins?

Like this box:

Is it?

Is it?

Could be...

Could be…

Sold at auction and shows up in a flea market.

Strange world.

.

More Concealed Than Secret.

May of 2014, I visited my favorite consignment/antiques shop in Raleigh. I stop in there every time I make the trip. Usually at least once a month. Being a consignment shop, they have really good turnover of inventory. Always something new to see. This day they had a good assortment of unusual and unique piece including two desks with some age and secured storage areas. I wouldn’t call them secret in that they are obvious (to me) and both are on the surface and easily accessible. More out of sight. First one is in this handsome, carved slant top:

Not new.

Not new.

First thing of interest is that the lopers (supports for the desk top) are drawers and not boards as is usually the case.

Drawers for lopers, unusual but it's done.

Drawers for lopers, unusual but it’s done. Not dovetailed.

Then you notice the dead space between the lopers where there should be a drawer.

There's no drawer here.

There’s no drawer here.

Here is the view of the gallery:

No secret compartment behind the gallery.

No secret compartments behind the gallery. Drawers are all full depth.

But when you look closely at the floor of the gallery,, you see that the center board slides to the back.

A loose board, what do you know?

A loose board, what do you know?

There is storage where the drawer should be. It is secured when the slant top is locked. Not secret but not obvious.

This desk uses the same technique but is a bit more obvious:

Again, no drawer between the lopers.

Again, no drawer between the more conventional lopers.

When you look at the gallery, it is more obvious that the floor slides back.

The thumb catch gives it away.

The thumb catch and molding gives it away. Click for a better view.

There is more access in this desk. The larger slide helps.

Easier but more visible.

Easier but more visible.

These were most likely just some a quick place to hide your works in progress.

Lots of other things to see in this set.

Did you know Kreg did not invent the pocket screw?

Pocket screws have been around for quite some time. Well over 5 years.

Pocket screws have been around for quite some time. Well over 5 years.

And there is a server with my favorite lock. The centrally located lock that locks two drawers. Nothing if not cost-effective.

It's typically French but I like i

It’s typically French but I like it.

If anybody knows the name of this lock or knows where one can be purchased, do let me know.

To see more pictures of these desks and others, just click this WORD.

Steppingstone Farm Museum: If Roy Had a Museum, This Might Be It.

I first heard about the Steppingstone Farm Museum from Shannon Rogers (of The Renaissance Woodworker) on a Woodtalk Online podcast. I learned more when we worked at adjacent benches at the Woodwright’s School taking Elia Bizzarri’s Continuous Arm Rocker class. (I think I just set a new record for links per paragraph.)

A few weeks back, we were visiting some friends in Baltimore for a few days and were looking for a day trip to take with them and their kids and their kids. I suggested we visit the Steppingstone Farm Museum. It is located in Havre de Grace, MD, about an hour north of Baltimore on I-95. Much to my surprise, all agreed and we went.

To steal from their description:

Steppingstone museum is a private, not for profit museum which preserves and demonstrates the rural arts and crafts of the 1880-1920 period in Harford County. The Steppingstone collection is comprised of domestic arts, skilled trades tools. and farm implements. The artifacts in each category were used by skilled specialists whose talents are scarce in our present urban and industrial society.  Our founder wished us to represent the “last rural generation”- people who lived off the land and crafted their livelihoods by hand.

A noble pursuit.

And I took pictures.

They have there the J. Edmund Bull Antique Tool Collection consisting largely of antique tools. They have many examples of the latest in foot powered machinery:

Foot powered scroll saw.

Foot powered scroll saw.

Some shaving horses:

Not typical but not rare.

Not typical but not rare.

A volunteer was using this spill plane:

They really like their spill plane.

They really like their spill plane. Note the period correct water bottle.

Hand tools for the farm workers:

More fun to look at than use.

More fun to look at than use.

A one man saw:

folded up and stored safely.

folded and safely stored.

Our friend Roy Underhill demonstrating a similar saw at his mill.

Not folded and stored safely

Not folded and stored safely.

Buildings:

This is a typical building.

This is a typical building.

There is also a an exhibit detailing canneries in Harford County:

A representative canning table.

A representative canning table.

The Historical Society of Harford County has identified close to 700 canneries that operated in the county between 1880 and 1959. Once again to steal content:

Harford County canned mostly corn and tomatoes. Canneries typically loaned farmers the money to buy seed and fertilizer. In exchange the Cannery Owner set the schedule for planting and harvesting so he could balance the workload of the cannery. The large canneries actually established banks to help support the industry thus benefitting another business in Harford County.

The youngest members of our entourage were 2 and 6 so I wasn’t able to visit all there was to see before it was time to head south. Life is a compromise and even I can’t always get my way. Naps wait for no man.

I plan on going back.

To see the rest of the pictures from the museum, go HERE.

Yet One More Till of Mystery…

Looking through unreleased photo sets on Flickr, I found yet another till with a secret. I know it’s hard to believe but they were fairly common with only the technique changing slightly.

This chest looks innocent enough. A dovetailed blanket chest:

A chest like many other chests.

A chest like many other chests.

with its till on the left.

Most tills are on the left.

Most tills are on the left.

Suspiciously, the till is deeper on the outside than the inside, always a clue. A bit of experimentation reveals the drawer:

You knew there would be a drawer.

You knew there would be a drawer.

In this case, the dado on the right, (back)  of the chest, is deeper. You slide the till front to the right (rear) and left side a (toward the front) swings clear of the case and is free. Like this:

A deep dado and a loose till front.

A deep dado and a loose till front.

I am impressed with the number of different ways that furniture makes have found to  almost hide things. At least the ones I have found. There is a desk in Danville, PA that has a secret compartment we haven’t cracked yet.

There are other items in this set like this blanket chest with no (known) secret compartments:

No secrets but a nice job of grain painting.

No secrets but a nice job of grain painting.

Here we have somebody’s partial collection of coffee grinders:

Lots more than I have.

Lots more than I have. I don’t drink coffee. Or collect coffee grinders.

Lots more to see at my Flickr that you can find HERE.

More later.

Wrapping Up Cameron – Spring 2015

As I have mentioned before, the antiques dealers in Cameron, NC have an antiques street fair the first Saturday in May and October. The town has many dealers and the open space between the shops if filled with peripatetic dealers or churches and non-profits sponsored parking lots. And food vendors offering products of questionable nutritional value. (I married a dietitian that really likes good food.)

I already got one blog out of the May event. In Another Day of Firsts, I wrote about a unique cradle and beveled door gaps on an armoire:

Door gap concealed by beveled door edges.

Door gap concealed by beveled door edges.

Believe it or not, there was more to see. Like this rather handsome, two-toned  cabinet:

At one of the permanent shops but it still counts.

At one of the permanent shops but it still counts. It might not be old but it is interesting.

One well know author, publisher and furniture enthusiast that been writing (and building) much furniture of rather simple construction generally and “staked furniture” specifically. I saw this bench:

I believe it is staked.

I believe it is staked.

with unique legs:

A form I haven't seen before.

A form I haven’t seen before.

And a small decorated box:

Again, one of the permanent dealers.

Again, one of the permanent dealers.

The last teaser I offer here is yet another “secret” compartment. It exists in this blanket chest:

The secret lies within.

The secret lies within.

It has this ordinary looking till:

Why is this till different from all other tills?

Why is this till different from all other tills?

The front wall of the till lifts revealing drawers:

Front till rides in dadoes and is captive.

Till front rides in dadoes and is captive.

Two drawers:

Don't love the pulls but they are low profile and low cost.

Don’t love the pulls but they are low profile and low-cost.

You can see these and all the rest at my Flickr set by clicking HERE.

That’s all for now. I will be back in Cameron come October 3rd.

The blog pace should increase now that I am back from my sister’s wedding in Missouri. Who gets married on a Wednesday?

Life Imitating Blogs: Follow-Up

In my last blog, Life Imitating Blogs, I wrote about a secret compartment I found in a desk at a local auction:

A genuine secret compartment from an antique.

A genuine secret compartment from an antique desk.

I wrote about comparing it to one I built for a Pennsylvania spice box in Do As I Say, Not As I Do:

My new version.

My new version.

I re-read the blog I realized I hadn’t ever looked into how the handle was attached to the drawer. I was curious and couldn’t tell looking at the pictures I had. This was Friday and the auction wasn’t until Saturday. Me being me, I went back and looked.

I pulled out the drawers and got another perspective:

Just to show you where it hides.

Just to show you where it hides.

And it lives here.

And where it lives.

Here is the bottom view:

Fairly typical drawer construction.

Fairly typical drawer construction.

A close-up shows you more detail of the construction:

This picture reveals much.

This picture reveals much.

The camouflage divider wood is attached to the rest of the handle with a bridle joint (or open mortise and tenon). Impressive in 3/16″ wood. Handle is attached to the box with a dado.

But, wait, there’s more! Is the dado really enough to have kept the handle attached? A quick look inside the box shows how it is secured.

A  view from within the box reveals much.

A view from within the box reveals much.

The dado is good for alignment but a wedged through tenon actually makes sure everything stays together.

Getting a second look at the auction forces me to withdraw my statement about there being no dovetailed blanket chest. There is one. It was under a table behind some chairs.

It's painted!

It’s painted! Not exactly typical.

A nice, clean interior. No mothball smell.

A nice, clean interior. No mothball smell.

And dovetails…

Such as they are.

Such as they are.

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